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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know how this Sitzmarker test is interpreted?My wife has just had test reults which show the markers are evenly distributed throughout her bowels, and this we are told means that her peristalsis is scrambled neurologically and therefore is no longer workable, with the result that the only out is to remove all the bowels totally, and to live on IV TPN afterwards.This seems like a major decision based on this test. Does anyone know if that is a reasonable diagnosis? Is the Sitzmarker test truly reliable, or what?Peter.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Take the test again. I had this particular study done three times. The results varied drastically each time. Initially there was talk of removing parts of my intestines / bowels, but I have had every test imaginable and still have all of my body parts. Granted I am still miserable 80% of the time, but I am still undergoing testing. Hang in there. My colon also stopped workin, ddiscuss medications with your GI
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Biddy,Thank you for the reply re. Sitzmarker Test. I wonder if anyone has found on the Net a description of this test, and what the results mean?It seems to be a major decision to have all your bowels removed based on the distribution of plastic particles in the gut, doesn't it?Peter.PS Another question. My wife has had a paraneoplastic syndrome diagnosed 3 years ago (ataxia etc). Can this lead to gastro problems like ongoing vomiting?Thanks.P.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am amazed that you mentioned the ongoing vomitting; that is my latest progression. I have been throwing up 95% of what I ingest for 5 weeks. I had an abdomen CT enema today and am flying out of state for further testing.Your GI should have tons of information on this study. It is relatively new and so to say the latest fad. Did they perform the KUB xrays until all of the markers were gone. I went in every day for 15 days. Has your wife had a colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, CT scans, mri, barrium enema... there should be a series of tests a mile long before you opt for this surgery. Plus, what about a partial removal, where they connect the top to the bottom and it will still be fully functional. So many people have this surgery and still suffer immensely from a variety of symptoms. Please be leary and do not rush into any thing. I will ask my GI about the connection of ataxia.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The sitzmark test is commonly used to assess colonic motility. The basis of the test is to determine whether colonic transit is normal or abnormal. This is determined by the persistence of markers (>6/24) five days after ingestion. If >19/24 have been expelled, transit is generally normal. If markers remain, it indicates disturbed colonic transit. If most markers are found in the rectosigmoid, it suggests obstructive defecation. If markers are found throughout the colon, it is consistent with colonic inertia OR obstructive defecation. If the test is normal, you're done. If the test is abnormal, it does not need to be performed repeatedly, nor is there documented utility in taking x-rays every day until all the markers are gone. If the test is abnormal, it suggests significant impairment in colonic transit which should be further clarified by other studies to exclude pseudoobstruction syndromes (which can be paraneoplastic and have vomiting associated), obstructive defecation syndromes and (always) mecahnical obstruction if it's not been done.No one should have surgery performed based solely on the results of a sitzmark study.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Further for DocJ:This connection between Paraneoplastic Syndrome / Pseudoobstruction / Vomiting, is this a common thing? Is there any way of breaking this chain of events to prevent the vomiting, or prevent the pseudoobstruction to let the bowels function naturally.As far as I can understand the Syndrome, it is an immune system thing, releasing anti-Hu antibodies which attack the cerebellum.But the GI feels the Syndrome is the cause of the vomiting, the Neurologist feels the Syndrome cannot cause the vomiting, which is an entirely separate problem.Hard to know which to credit.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
PeterTThis is not a common syndrome, but it's recognized. Treatment is largely symptomatic. At this point, there is no recognized therapy which is directed at the underlying problem of anti-neuronal antibodies damaging gut/CNS nerves.
 
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