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NEWMILLENIUMDAVIS:If you are loooking for the lowest probability of sensitivity, Start with rice milk as it is less likely to cauSe any reactivity than soy milk is...a larger and larger % of the population is beginning to suffer some loss of ORAL tolerance to soy due its progressively increasing consumption via additive/extract of sOy being in so many things...like wheat consumption it is becoming pervasive.Plus better than 30% of the soy harvested now is genetically modified, and it is not clear if this is part of the problem since the beans are comongled freely except in Euro exports, where GM soy is considered verboten deu to the lack of adequate safety testing of the product in the USA.The only assessment has been as to the probability of the GM soy casuing formation of specific IgE antibody to the GM soy...which is stupid in many peoples book since this is only one mechanism, the "allergy mechanism", and there are many other possible ways that an intolerance or sensitivity reaction can be created. This has not been evaluated nor will it be, for any GM foods at this time (corn is the other major offender...).When you do try soy, make sure you are at a point where you are stable, then cionsume the soy milk freely with each meal for 3 days or so....if there is no change in your symptoms after 3 days of liberal intake you are certainly at present tolerant of THAT dose!Eat well. Think well. Be well.MNL
 

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NEWMILLENIUMDAVIS:If you are loooking for the lowest probability of sensitivity, Start with rice milk as it is less likely to cauSe any reactivity than soy milk is...a larger and larger % of the population is beginning to suffer some loss of ORAL tolerance to soy due its progressively increasing consumption via additive/extract of sOy being in so many things...like wheat consumption it is becoming pervasive.Plus better than 30% of the soy harvested now is genetically modified, and it is not clear if this is part of the problem since the beans are comongled freely except in Euro exports, where GM soy is considered verboten deu to the lack of adequate safety testing of the product in the USA.The only assessment has been as to the probability of the GM soy casuing formation of specific IgE antibody to the GM soy...which is stupid in many peoples book since this is only one mechanism, the "allergy mechanism", and there are many other possible ways that an intolerance or sensitivity reaction can be created. This has not been evaluated nor will it be, for any GM foods at this time (corn is the other major offender...).When you do try soy, make sure you are at a point where you are stable, then cionsume the soy milk freely with each meal for 3 days or so....if there is no change in your symptoms after 3 days of liberal intake you are certainly at present tolerant of THAT dose!Eat well. Think well. Be well.MNL
 

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Rice milk is more watery than real milk, whereas soy milk is a little thicker. At least the kinds I buy are like that. They also taste different...you gotta get what you like best. I've never been able to drink milk, and drinking one of the substitutes also is not appetizing to me. I can put vanilla rice milk on some cereals, like Honey Nut Cheerios. I usually eat my cereal dry (and I like it that way!).I use rice or soy milk for almost all my cooking. Usually if it's vanilla flavored it doesn't affect the taste of my mac n cheese or whatever very much.The cool thing about rice and soy milk is that it is good on your shelf, unopened, for a long time. So when I see a sale, I'll stock up and then stick it in the pantry. Usually what I have depends on what was on sale!Oh yeah, and make sure you buy the kind that is fortified...it is much better for you!While you're buying non-dairy stuff, some of my faves are Amy's soy cheese pizza (in the health food section of the frozen food dept at bigger grocery stores) and Tofutti "ice cream." Mmmmmmmmmmm
 

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Rice milk is more watery than real milk, whereas soy milk is a little thicker. At least the kinds I buy are like that. They also taste different...you gotta get what you like best. I've never been able to drink milk, and drinking one of the substitutes also is not appetizing to me. I can put vanilla rice milk on some cereals, like Honey Nut Cheerios. I usually eat my cereal dry (and I like it that way!).I use rice or soy milk for almost all my cooking. Usually if it's vanilla flavored it doesn't affect the taste of my mac n cheese or whatever very much.The cool thing about rice and soy milk is that it is good on your shelf, unopened, for a long time. So when I see a sale, I'll stock up and then stick it in the pantry. Usually what I have depends on what was on sale!Oh yeah, and make sure you buy the kind that is fortified...it is much better for you!While you're buying non-dairy stuff, some of my faves are Amy's soy cheese pizza (in the health food section of the frozen food dept at bigger grocery stores) and Tofutti "ice cream." Mmmmmmmmmmm
 

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i'm actually really fond of rice milk now!! the vanilla is my fave though..to me it's about the same as drinking skim milk, which is what i drank before i gave up milk!soy milk did NOT agree with me though
and the texture of it was just blechy to me.. sort of chalky..
 

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i'm actually really fond of rice milk now!! the vanilla is my fave though..to me it's about the same as drinking skim milk, which is what i drank before i gave up milk!soy milk did NOT agree with me though
and the texture of it was just blechy to me.. sort of chalky..
 
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While I can't seem to tolerate milk, I can have a little yogurt, probably because it's fermented. Yogurt is pretty good in oatmeal, especially if a little strawberry or blueberry jelly is added. I don't miss the milk at all, and it is very "creamy."
 
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While I can't seem to tolerate milk, I can have a little yogurt, probably because it's fermented. Yogurt is pretty good in oatmeal, especially if a little strawberry or blueberry jelly is added. I don't miss the milk at all, and it is very "creamy."
 

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i started out with rice dream and now mostly drink chocolate silk (soymilk). wow, i love the stuff. i bake with it, cook with the plain version, drink it, make shakes with it. yum. you might want to take mike's advice and start with rice dream and eventually try soy milk. silk sells 'milk chugs' that are in the small plastic containers like milk chugs. trying a smaller container like that might save you money if you can't tolerate it.
 

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i started out with rice dream and now mostly drink chocolate silk (soymilk). wow, i love the stuff. i bake with it, cook with the plain version, drink it, make shakes with it. yum. you might want to take mike's advice and start with rice dream and eventually try soy milk. silk sells 'milk chugs' that are in the small plastic containers like milk chugs. trying a smaller container like that might save you money if you can't tolerate it.
 

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I much prefer Lactaid, but if you can't handle that rice milk is my next fave. Like others, it seemed more like "milk" to me. I've never been a big "milk" drinker though.
 

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I much prefer Lactaid, but if you can't handle that rice milk is my next fave. Like others, it seemed more like "milk" to me. I've never been a big "milk" drinker though.
 

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I'm lactose intolerant and hate milk. But, I know I need it so when I saw chocolate soy milk I tried it. Quick invite to D for me, I fear. Thanks for the rice milk idea - I may try that.(BTW - anyone else out there who cannot drink milk but can eat cheese and yogurt with minimal probs?)Pat
 

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I'm lactose intolerant and hate milk. But, I know I need it so when I saw chocolate soy milk I tried it. Quick invite to D for me, I fear. Thanks for the rice milk idea - I may try that.(BTW - anyone else out there who cannot drink milk but can eat cheese and yogurt with minimal probs?)Pat
 

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Shadowy Figure: __________________________________"BTW - anyone else out there who cannot drink milk but can eat cheese and yogurt with minimal probs?)" __________________________________In case no one else responds, you are not alone. It is fairly common for a person to be milk intolerant, but to be able to tolerate certasin amounts of processed dairy products. In the simplest terms, they are each changed into another substance, with some dairy fractions removed or altered in the process, which can creat a new intolerance reaction OR creat a substance which IS tolerated. So I have seen a lot of people who can tolerate one "cow product" and not another....since sensitivity, unlike allergy, is dose-dependent, if you reduce the amount per unit volume of the milk fraction that is in the product compared to the milk base, you reduce your sensitivity to it.If you have a real IgE allergy, however, even a small amount of a given milk protein which remeians can still rigger an alergic response. The heating involved in pasteurization can also alter the potential for sensitization as well. This is probably the most "complicated" class of sensitivitieis and intolerances and allergies to sort out as the range of products and possibilities, plus the range of sensitivity meachnisms, is very broad.PLUS, the antigenicity of some products will vary by the regionwhere it was processed, as different chemicals and/or bacteria will be present in the core products or the processed products...thus one may tolerate on "brand" of Cheese A, say, but not another Brand of Cheese A.This at firt explanation by immunologists sounded far fetched to me,until the immunologic soup that is cow milke, and what things given to cow get into the soup, were elucidated at several conferences I once went to where it was discussed.This is one of the many reasons that milks sensitivity so often is erroneously assumed to be lactose intolerance when it si not the lactose at all, bit one of the many other substances.Not rrying to confuse, but clarify a consuinf subjetc when looked at from the patients side...and oral challenges.MNL
 
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