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I finally received my CDSA results back from "Great Smokies" and it showed that I have "chirobacter freundii" in my stool (a kind of bacteria) and my short chain fatty acid distribution is way too low. I have no parasites or yeast, but my 'bacterial dysbiosis index' is very severe. My naturopath has me taking 'flax seed oil' (1 capsule a day) and a herb called "Uva-Ursi" for the bacterial infection. Can anyone tell me if they have been diagnosed with something similar and if so- has this herb worked for them? I don't know much about this herb and wonder if this will finally get my digestive problems under control. Also- any information anyone has on "chirobacter freundii" (ie. what is it exactly? How do you contract this? How long will it take to go away if I am on the appropriate herbs/drugs?, etc.) would be much appreciated! My naturopath was only of limited help in this as she is used to treating just yeast & parasites. My tummy/gas problems have been worse than ever, probably due to stress of the holidays, having my period and having temporarily (I think) left my husband (I needed a break from him as his demands on me were getting too much and we were fighting a lot). Thanks to everyone on this board for their support/help and happy holidays....
 

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You are probably aren't going to learn much here or anywhere. Just because you have this bacteria doesn't automatically mean that you have an infection from it. You need to know if it were producing toxins and if that were the case, you'd probably have bad diarrhea. (Maybe if they can't blame on yeast, they go for the next best thing.)Who knows what those natural antibiotics are killing. After all, most antibiotics are natural.It's also not clear how they know you are low in SCFA. Compared to whom? Maybe that has always been your normal. Maybe you don't eat a lot of carboydrates (e.g, fiber).How can they calculate a dysbiosis index based on not knowing the state of most of the other bacteria in your gut?If you want to increase the SCFAs, which probably wouldn't hurt you, you could start downing some Lactobacillus GG and FOS, but there are no guarantees about fixing IBS, though (perhaps it may reduce your risk of colon cancer).[This message has been edited by flux (edited 12-26-1999).]
 
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snoopy -- I don't know anything about that herb, Uva... Note that we had another topic, which turned out to be "controversial," last week (did you see it?) where dysbiosis was briefly described. For more info., you might also want to look at Persistance's medical article post from just before Christmas.I'm not sure that I know what's "normal" and what isn't in terms of levels of gut bacteria. I, myself, seem to have had a bacterial problem -- amoung other things. Apparently, the problem also showed up in tests. In my case, I feel pretty confident of the bacterial imbalance/infection because of the nature of my symptoms (such as "scheduled" burning in stomach, later followed by burning in other organs).I also have been taking flax oil and other types of omega-3, though quite a bit more than you are taking. I am taking that, not really because of bacteria, but because tests clearly showed I was very low in omega-3 (and other essential fatty acids). I can't say that it's necessarily helping improve the bacterial balance. However, as I've mentioned in other posts, I believe I can rave about other significant improvements since taking the flax. Good luck!
 

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I too took the test and was described as having the exact same problems--specifically SCFA and the citrobacter. That was nearly 3 years and a bunch of grief ago. As is pointed-out above, there is a recent thread about dysbiosis where I explain my story in some detail. I would be very happy to also talk through e-mail.Incidentally, one thing I failed to point-out in my long-winded story about dysbiosis and my struggles is that I am aware of others off this list who had that citrobacter show-up. My short answer, after years of researching it, is that we all blew a wad of dough on that Great Smokies test for no reason.Sorry.
 

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Hi Snoopy:I don't have any answers to your questions but I was able to look up uva ursi for you at webmd.com, so I thought I'd copy the info for you. Uva ursi is also called bearberry. The article is interesting because it gives tips about keeping your diet alkaline while taking it, and other precautions:Brand name:BearberryLatin name: Arctostaphylos uva-ursiOther names: Arberry, Bearsgrape, Kinnickinick, Mealberry, Mountain Box, Mountain Cranberry, SandberryA Remedy For Urinary tract infectionsWhat It Is; Why It WorksBearberry has been used against urinary tract infections since the 17th century, and--despite the discovery of antibiotics--is stillin use today. It contains a substance called arbutin which has proven antibacterial properties.Bearberry works best when the urine is alkaline. To assure alkalinity, stick to a diet rich in fruits, vegetables (especiallytomatoes), and fruit juices. Taking small doses of sodium bicarbonate will also help assure alkaline urine. The antibacterial effectof each dose of Bearberry lasts 3 to 4 hours.Originally native to Spain, Bearberry has spread throughout Europe, Asia, and North America. There are two theoriesregarding its name: either that its awful taste makes it fit only for bears, or conversely, that bears are especially fond of it.Avoid If...Not for children under 12.Special CautionsDo not take this herb for extended periods without consulting your doctor. Protracted use can cause liver damage, particularlyin children.If you have a sensitive stomach, the herb can cause nausea and vomiting.Possible Drug InteractionsWhile using Bearberry, avoid medications and foods that make the urine acid (for example, citrus fruits, cranberries, andblueberries.)Special Information If You Are Pregnant or BreastfeedingDo not take this medication if you are pregnant or nursing.How To PrepareYou can make a Bearberry tea from 2.5 grams (1 teaspoonful) of finely cut or coarsely powdered herb. Either mix it with 150milliliters (two-thirds of a cup) of cold water and bring rapidly to a boil, or pour boiling water over it. Steep for 15 minutes, thenstrain.Typical DosageBearberry is taken orally. The usual dosage of the tea is 150 milliliters up to 4 times a day.Strengths of commercial preparations may vary. Follow the manufacturer's labeling whenever available.OverdosageWhen taken in excessive amounts, Bearberry can inflame the lining of the bladder and urinary tract.------------------"Never let the fear of striking out get in your way." Babe Ruth. And I'm also Praying with Bettie for a cure for this NASTY IBS! Jean
 

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Hi Dinah:Other sources of omega-3 fatty acids are fish, flaxseed or flaxseed meal (already mentioned), walnuts and walnut oil. I'm on my way to work so don't have time, but if you would like a list of some fish with their omega-3 fatty acids content let me know and I'll post it tonight!Jean------------------"Never let the fear of striking out get in your way." Babe Ruth. And I'm also Praying with Bettie for a cure for this NASTY IBS! Jean
 
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