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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK. This could be long - Apologies.I have recently Been Diagnosed as Having IBS. This is wrecking my life, From What I have been reading here i am nowhere near as bad as most, but the mental affect is becoming Brutal. I have gone from being a very outgoing, confident, (Cocky!) succesful Graduate into a complete Shell. I seem to produce stools that although are not always watery, are very soft and not well formed. My GI Specialist indicated one Immodium a day to slow things down, but i can still be having 6 BM's a Day, Usually Morning focused. However i can have a solid stool in the morning which Is followed as little as 10 minutes later with another soft product, which when wants to come out means you need to go there and then basically.I have had 3 near calls on the D Front(Although well spaced apart), once having to get a friend to stop the car on the Motorway and dive up the bank. AND THIS HEREIN BRINGS MY TERRORI have just assumed a new role as an Account Manager in the business I work for, I have to visit My first Customer for a negotiation on New Business on Monday taking a colleague in the Car for a trip to Manchester from Birmingham (For those outside the uk, this is a trip up the M6 Motorway notorious for bad traffic jams and road works) And my return Journey will be in Rush Hour Traffic. I am terrfied that I cannot make this journey.(Getting caught short in a traffic jam, or in roadworks where I cannot pull off the road no matter what) Does anyone have ANY emergency measures ? I get this feeling a lot that I should be on the Loo and it's so hard to ignore or concentrate, I don't want to have an episode with this guy in the car and I don't want to F###!K things up with my customer. I have booked a Hypnotherapy consultation but can't get in till Tuesday next week. ANY tips on foods that are almost dead cert safe, techniques to help me cope, suggestions anything. I really am worried about this one. Thanks------------------Unless You Have IBS, They will never really understand.[This message has been edited by traversd (edited 09-20-2001).]
 

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HelloUntil your doctor can help you more thoroughly with different meds or advice, this next Monday when you need to travel, I would certainly up my dose of Immodium from the original one a day. Many people find it helps with travel. I, personally, would take one before bedtime the night before, and then maybe one or two that morning . Good luck.
 

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HelloUntil your doctor can help you more thoroughly with different meds or advice, this next Monday when you need to travel, I would certainly up my dose of Immodium from the original one a day. Many people find it helps with travel. I, personally, would take one before bedtime the night before, and then maybe one or two that morning . Good luck.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thankyou, Katydid.Sounds like a good idea. I have never been so bothered or i think the word is scared. In my life.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thankyou, Katydid.Sounds like a good idea. I have never been so bothered or i think the word is scared. In my life.
 

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Oooh, I know how you feel. I used to have to travel along the M4 everyday to work from Reading. I just couldn't help worrying all the time that I would get caught short, although in a year I never did!Are you driving yourself? I always found that concentrating on the traffic stopped me from thinking about it. Katydid's advice on the Imodium is good - I use Diocalm myself which is not quite a strong I think, but I am confident that it will "hold me together!"Longer term, I had a Clinical Psychologist on my case which really helped. I won't spout all the psychological stuff here but it is really good. I'm an outgoing, high-achieving ;-) graduate like yourself, and I was knocked a bit sideways by IBS (refused to admit it for ages - numpty!) I've tried to get right back to being confident again. I've even explained the problem to clients - with suitable touches of humour where appropriate! They're always really understanding - there's a lot of people out there with IBS so they often know someone else. You could explain it to your colleague that you are travelling with, I'm sure they'll be understanding.Let us know how you get on - good luck.[This message has been edited by UKgirl (edited 09-20-2001).]
 

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Oooh, I know how you feel. I used to have to travel along the M4 everyday to work from Reading. I just couldn't help worrying all the time that I would get caught short, although in a year I never did!Are you driving yourself? I always found that concentrating on the traffic stopped me from thinking about it. Katydid's advice on the Imodium is good - I use Diocalm myself which is not quite a strong I think, but I am confident that it will "hold me together!"Longer term, I had a Clinical Psychologist on my case which really helped. I won't spout all the psychological stuff here but it is really good. I'm an outgoing, high-achieving ;-) graduate like yourself, and I was knocked a bit sideways by IBS (refused to admit it for ages - numpty!) I've tried to get right back to being confident again. I've even explained the problem to clients - with suitable touches of humour where appropriate! They're always really understanding - there's a lot of people out there with IBS so they often know someone else. You could explain it to your colleague that you are travelling with, I'm sure they'll be understanding.Let us know how you get on - good luck.[This message has been edited by UKgirl (edited 09-20-2001).]
 

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I think it takes time to work out the accommodations we need to make in our lives to adapt to life with IBS. The first step, as you point out, is to try to get your IBS under control as much as possible -- through hypnotherapy, diet, exercise, etc. Then, when you develop a regime that works for you, you'll know the baseline from which you need to make adjustments. Then you need to sort things out from the workplace angle, so that you aren't required to put yourself into situations that you physically can't deal with. This may mean leveling with your boss and making accomodations to your present job or moving into a different job with greater flexibility. If your IBS isn't severe, you can still be successful careerwise, but it does require some accommodation and adjustments as you continue your career climb.
 

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I think it takes time to work out the accommodations we need to make in our lives to adapt to life with IBS. The first step, as you point out, is to try to get your IBS under control as much as possible -- through hypnotherapy, diet, exercise, etc. Then, when you develop a regime that works for you, you'll know the baseline from which you need to make adjustments. Then you need to sort things out from the workplace angle, so that you aren't required to put yourself into situations that you physically can't deal with. This may mean leveling with your boss and making accomodations to your present job or moving into a different job with greater flexibility. If your IBS isn't severe, you can still be successful careerwise, but it does require some accommodation and adjustments as you continue your career climb.
 
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