Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Digestive Health Support Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
was there more on it then this? http://www.time.com/time/covers/1101030120/story.html This was in there also on treating depression."Depression: What You Can DoWe've come a long way from Freud's couch. The big breakthrough arrived in the late 1980s with the advent of safer and more widely effective drugs, like Prozac. According to Dr. Bruce Cohen of Harvard's McLean Hospital, we're on the cusp of a new era in treatment as the search for a single magic pill for depression gives way to a broad spectrum of therapies.Today's TreatmentsMost antidepressants work by tweaking levels of various neurotransmitters, the chemicals that carry signals from one neuron to another. Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft and the other SSRIs slow the absorption of serotonin. Effective antidepressants that act on both serotonin and norepinephrine include Effexor and Remeron.Drugs like Wellbutrin work in a similar way but probably on the neurotransmitters norepinephrine and dopamine. The tricyclic antidepressants (such as Elavil and Tofranil) also blocked the absorption of neurotransmitters, especially norepinephrine, but the drugs had significant side effects. Another class of first-generation drugs, the monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) such as Nardil and Marplan, can be effective but can also produce dangerous side effects. A transdermal patch just approved by the Food and Drug Administration will give new life to MAOIs by reducing the side effects they sometimes caused when taken orally.On the HorizonResearchers are exploring two related molecules, gaba and glutamate, that are responsible for 90% of chemical signaling in the brain. Because they control so much of the brain's activity, the trick is to fine-tune their levels in ways that relieve depression but don't affect other brain functions. Other targets of drug development: the sex hormone testosterone (a transdermal patch proved effective in a recent clinical trial for men); the stress hormone cortisol, which researchers are trying to regulate with the abortion drug RU 486 and compounds called CRF antagonists; the dynorphins (the evil twins of feel-good endorphins); and a chemical called substance P, involved in pain pathways closely related to depression."TEXT BY DAVID BJERKLIE http://www.time.com/time/health/ a lot of chemicals they are studying in IBS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
EricWhat questions should one ask to find a physician who is up on and works with this mind/body connection? It's so disheartening to find a Dr. you feel a connection with and then have it all come down to just prescribing another med and leave you thinking that they really think it's all just in your head and you should just take the meds and stop wasting time with trying to understand why and how it all works. We have to be our own advocates anymore, and we need to understand these connections and how they apply to us personaly, not just generally, to be effective at it. What sort of a doctor should I be looking for? My internist is pleasant, but knows little. GI is kind and knowledgable, but likes to run tests and then say everything appears "normal." This isn't helpful! Where else should I be looking?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
LML, I really understand. I personally think a lot of it is up to us with IBS after we have been diagnosed to do the best we can to control it. Thats a big part of why the education is so important.also as Dr Palsson said to systematically work on it with time and not beat yourself up to much looking to be totally cured.Taking as much of the worry of IBS out I also feel can help once your diagnosed and worry plays a lot into IBS form is it cancer to worry where the bathroom is or worry will I go or how bad will the pain from the next attack be ect..The regular and specialist doctors for the most part in the time they have speciffically look for problems, not so much tell you how to solve them.if your lucky you may find a good one and one who is up on current research. I think a lot of doctors do know these connections but don't explain them so well to their patients and its easy for them to say here is a pill to hopefully fix it, which is not always that successful for one because IBS is not totally curable and 2 so many issues and symptoms are related in both the brain and gut, so personally looking and working on some issues involved with IBS and finding whatever specialists can help you helps.Its a combination of treating both the brain and the gut, and its pretty much the same, diet, calming the central nervous system and treating your gut nice and gentle all the time, and also giving time for treatments to work one at a time and by targeting the wole condition and also a persons major/main symptoms.This would be a good question to ask in the UNC chats with the experts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Thanks, Eric ... and you're so right, of course.Unfortunately, patience hasn't been my finest virtue. I was just feeling frustrated of late. I shall endeavor to calm myself, and try to deal with one issue at a time. Eating for my IBS is not necessarily the same as eating to soothe GERD symptoms, not to mention my brain. I guess it's going to just take some time, effort and good note keeping to find the right balance that will work for everything. Thanks for the info and good reminder. I'm taking slow deep breaths now ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's about it LML. What symptoms do you have at the moment as the most troublesome.Its tougher of course when there is more then one problem also, such as gerd and IBS ect..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Eric, right now C and bloating are the biggestIBS issues. Miralax daily, and an occasional hitof 1000 mg magnesium help with the C. The bloating, there doesn't seem to be answers for. I've tried creon, lots of different probiotics, diet changes, etc. The GERD was seemingly better, with daily Nexium and dietary avoidances for 6 months, but the last month it's as though there was no progress. It seems to have a mind of it's own like the IBS. I've started listening to Mike's tapes again ... and am just waiting for something positive to kick in. Sorry you asked?!I'm wondering if a dietitian or someone like that could help guide me in choosing what I could eat that will help keep things calm.Thanks, Linda
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,983 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Glad your listening to Mike's tapes.
Do you get excersise? Do you have an excersise regimen?Bloating is caused by some different things even they are not to clear on.Seeing a dietian isn't a bad idea. There is some food info out there, Heathers books and quite a bit of general info though.Yoga may actually be good for this the bloating and c perhaps, even though perhaps a little tough to start until you see improvements.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Again ... thanks for the good suggestions, Eric.As far as exercise goes, yes, I have a pretty good program. Tennis, walking, Yoga, kayaking in the summer and whatever else turns up. (Best hike was in the rainforest in Borneo a couple of years ago. Not a stick in the mud here! My bloating unfortunately doesn't particularly respond well to exercise, but I do it anyway whenever I can. I'll check out Heather's book and maybe some diet suggestions will be helpful.Linda
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top