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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did something stupid: Ate some Campbell's soup. Split pea with ham and bacon, it's the only soup or broth I've found without onion in it.I read the label, but somehow missed the "natural flavoring" which indicates MSG made from soy. So I had a worse allergic reaction than I've had in years.I've been in bed most of the day with it - Normally a small amount of soy wouldn't get me this bad, I think this happened because my seasonal allergies are at their worst right now. My sinuses swelled up and I had pain around my eyes and on the side of my head.I *also* had burning stomach pain similar to the pain I get from fructose, but milder. I've had 5 normal BMs since 3:00 yesterday when I ate the soup, and feel another coming on. While I was in bed today I remembered I used to get this reaction frequently before I learned I'm allergic to soy, including the tummy pain. Mike is this pain caused by my allergy? Are my soy allergy and IBS more closely related than I realized? I think I saw something in your posts about mast cells being released in the digestion, and that's an allergic reaction, right?If my soy allergy and IBS are related, could my seasonal allergies also cause my IBS? I'll monitor my IBS over the next year to see if it changes with the seasons.What do you think?
 

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Hi JuliaSo very sorry to see you suffering from environmental and food allergies along with your IBS.Is that the simplest answer you ever heard?
Basically in response to:"Mike is this pain caused by my allergy? Are my soy allergy and IBS more closely related than I realized? I think I saw something in your posts about mast cells being released in the digestion, and that's an allergic reaction, right?If my soy allergy and IBS are related, could my seasonal allergies also cause my IBS? I'll monitor my IBS over the next year to see if it changes with the seasons.What do you think?"...all your questions please insert YES wherever a YES or NO response would be appropriate.The only exception is "seasonal allergies cause my IBS". The inhalant alergies can aggravate your IBS symptoms....and the food allergy and the IBS are comorbid but "crossover" mechanisms that are similar.The answer there would be that the food allergies, mediated by specific IgE to certain foods AND that there are cross-reactions to specific foods linked to specific environemntal allergens, cause symptoms that can be mistaken for the symptoms of IBS and they are comorbid (coexisting) way more often than people have been led to beleive by a medical establishment that never actually looked at the frequency of comorbidity of food allergy in IBS patients and quantified it.They simply spout-off freqeuncy of incidense figures which apply to the general population (2% to 5% depending whose data are analyzed). BNut in that population are IBS patients whose incidence of fooda alergy comorbidity is higher than the mixed population. So the nonsense you hear abput food allergy being rare and so it has nothing to do with IBS is bad assumption.Immunologists and others who have mad a long-time practice of approaching symptoms sets from the immunologic/allergic perspective as opposed to symptomologic pigeon holing have long known that there are many patients who exhibvit symptoms of IBS who have comorbid alergy of all types up to and including asthma symptoms.Many in vitro assessments combined with oral challenge have provided confirmatory markers of same, and finally recent in vivo studies of the small bowel show that the mechanisms of food reactivity in IBS d and cyclic symptom sets are very closely related to the same abnormal immne mechanisms seen in environmental and food allergies....except that if you remove the patients who have IBS symptoms from true fod ALLERGY from the subject groups, you can still provoke their symptoms with specific foodsa or additives.AND the surprising part is when you look at the small bowel there is both an apparent mast cell and general immunocyte reaction (including the lymphocytes and other immune cells which work in conjucntion with the other bowel structures and flora as part of the bowels immunoprotective functions)even though you cannot detect the provoking foods with standard IgE assay nor even the wildly-optimistic skin prick testing.So WHAT is happening can be observed and quantified, but WHY the immune system is misbehaving remains unknown. There are several plausible theories and my take is that it is a different etiology or combination in different patients which will be linkable to the precurosr events eventually.So when your inhalant allergies are bad, there are a multitiude of mechanisms which can make your IBS symptoms worse...including cross-reactivity, lowered degranulation threshold of immunocytes due to active arming by IgE and in some cases inflammaoprovocative mediators being released by mast cells which will provoke other sells to respond (PAF is a real probnlem as platelets are loaded with serotonin...its not just the obvious histamine from gut mast cells acting like mast cells in the repsiratory tract) making them unstable.Get professor Brostoffs book, as you will not only come to understand the answers to your questions better, thus what your body is doing, but you will also have reference material galore for such things as which foods cross react with which types of inhalant allergens etc.�FOOD ALLERGIES AND FOOD INTOLERANCE: THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO THEIR IDENTIFICTION AND TREATMENT�, Professor Jonathan Brostoff (M.D.. Allergy, Immunology and Environmental Medicine, Kings� College, London) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/089...6487508-3420903 The upside of your misery as that a symptom set ike yours is highly manageble with dietary and envioronmental prophylaxis, as we have reliable in vitro tests for both allergies and non-allergenic sensitivty reactions which will allow isolation of most if not all of the provoking substances and then a lifestyle plan can be constructed to lead to effective prophylaxis.You are indeed applying logic which is confirmable with quantitative means. I just donot think you want to go to Swedent o get a catheter shived into your small bowel to isolate the non-allergic offending foods...there are other easier ways to do that clinically
Eat well, Think well, Be wellMNL__________________ www.leapallergy.com
 

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Hi JuliaSo very sorry to see you suffering from environmental and food allergies along with your IBS.Is that the simplest answer you ever heard?
Basically in response to:"Mike is this pain caused by my allergy? Are my soy allergy and IBS more closely related than I realized? I think I saw something in your posts about mast cells being released in the digestion, and that's an allergic reaction, right?If my soy allergy and IBS are related, could my seasonal allergies also cause my IBS? I'll monitor my IBS over the next year to see if it changes with the seasons.What do you think?"...all your questions please insert YES wherever a YES or NO response would be appropriate.The only exception is "seasonal allergies cause my IBS". The inhalant alergies can aggravate your IBS symptoms....and the food allergy and the IBS are comorbid but "crossover" mechanisms that are similar.The answer there would be that the food allergies, mediated by specific IgE to certain foods AND that there are cross-reactions to specific foods linked to specific environemntal allergens, cause symptoms that can be mistaken for the symptoms of IBS and they are comorbid (coexisting) way more often than people have been led to beleive by a medical establishment that never actually looked at the frequency of comorbidity of food allergy in IBS patients and quantified it.They simply spout-off freqeuncy of incidense figures which apply to the general population (2% to 5% depending whose data are analyzed). BNut in that population are IBS patients whose incidence of fooda alergy comorbidity is higher than the mixed population. So the nonsense you hear abput food allergy being rare and so it has nothing to do with IBS is bad assumption.Immunologists and others who have mad a long-time practice of approaching symptoms sets from the immunologic/allergic perspective as opposed to symptomologic pigeon holing have long known that there are many patients who exhibvit symptoms of IBS who have comorbid alergy of all types up to and including asthma symptoms.Many in vitro assessments combined with oral challenge have provided confirmatory markers of same, and finally recent in vivo studies of the small bowel show that the mechanisms of food reactivity in IBS d and cyclic symptom sets are very closely related to the same abnormal immne mechanisms seen in environmental and food allergies....except that if you remove the patients who have IBS symptoms from true fod ALLERGY from the subject groups, you can still provoke their symptoms with specific foodsa or additives.AND the surprising part is when you look at the small bowel there is both an apparent mast cell and general immunocyte reaction (including the lymphocytes and other immune cells which work in conjucntion with the other bowel structures and flora as part of the bowels immunoprotective functions)even though you cannot detect the provoking foods with standard IgE assay nor even the wildly-optimistic skin prick testing.So WHAT is happening can be observed and quantified, but WHY the immune system is misbehaving remains unknown. There are several plausible theories and my take is that it is a different etiology or combination in different patients which will be linkable to the precurosr events eventually.So when your inhalant allergies are bad, there are a multitiude of mechanisms which can make your IBS symptoms worse...including cross-reactivity, lowered degranulation threshold of immunocytes due to active arming by IgE and in some cases inflammaoprovocative mediators being released by mast cells which will provoke other sells to respond (PAF is a real probnlem as platelets are loaded with serotonin...its not just the obvious histamine from gut mast cells acting like mast cells in the repsiratory tract) making them unstable.Get professor Brostoffs book, as you will not only come to understand the answers to your questions better, thus what your body is doing, but you will also have reference material galore for such things as which foods cross react with which types of inhalant allergens etc.�FOOD ALLERGIES AND FOOD INTOLERANCE: THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO THEIR IDENTIFICTION AND TREATMENT�, Professor Jonathan Brostoff (M.D.. Allergy, Immunology and Environmental Medicine, Kings� College, London) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/089...6487508-3420903 The upside of your misery as that a symptom set ike yours is highly manageble with dietary and envioronmental prophylaxis, as we have reliable in vitro tests for both allergies and non-allergenic sensitivty reactions which will allow isolation of most if not all of the provoking substances and then a lifestyle plan can be constructed to lead to effective prophylaxis.You are indeed applying logic which is confirmable with quantitative means. I just donot think you want to go to Swedent o get a catheter shived into your small bowel to isolate the non-allergic offending foods...there are other easier ways to do that clinically
Eat well, Think well, Be wellMNL__________________ www.leapallergy.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Mike. I'm saving this for future reference.Quote: "the wildly-optimistic skin prick testing" Good one!
I've seen that stat before of 2-5% of the general population having food allergies, and I always thought it very low. If you consider the people you've known who throw up when they eat shellfish, for example, or who avoid certain fruits or veggies because they get rashes or tummyaches, etc. but have never had allergy testing, assuming all those reactions are allergies, the percentage is substantially higher. Then consider the people who are in generally poor health for unknown reasons, like I was, and how many people with food allergies are probably still undiagnosed because of the indifference and carelessness of the average doctor
, well, my educated guess is more like 20-30% of the general population has food allergies.I have seen you mention that book before, and I wrote down the name, but I didn't buy it yet because I don't have time to read anything right now - but I'm putting it at higher priority, I didn't realize it would apply specifically to me. I've done pretty well finding allergic and trigger foods on my own (I'm proud!), but I've had flare-ups the past few weeks from stress as far as I can tell, although I'm still testing stevia. I wondered if I had a delayed or buildup reaction to it, I'm going to stay off it 2 weeks, then try eating it every day for a while, I may have to do that several times to know for sure. It doesn't behave like my other trigger foods, with pain right after I eat it. However, now that I understand better the connection with allergies, it may be the flare-ups are related to that because my inhalant allergies are even worse than usual this year. I'm glad you think my symptoms are manageable - other than dietary changes with meds as needed, I also have a HEPA air purifier, which prevents me from waking up with headaches. Do you have any further suggestions on managing my symptoms? This is my favorite time of year for being outside, cool breezes, blue sky, fall colors
, I take plenty of allergy meds.Thanks again
[This message has been edited by Julia37 (edited 10-10-2001).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Mike. I'm saving this for future reference.Quote: "the wildly-optimistic skin prick testing" Good one!
I've seen that stat before of 2-5% of the general population having food allergies, and I always thought it very low. If you consider the people you've known who throw up when they eat shellfish, for example, or who avoid certain fruits or veggies because they get rashes or tummyaches, etc. but have never had allergy testing, assuming all those reactions are allergies, the percentage is substantially higher. Then consider the people who are in generally poor health for unknown reasons, like I was, and how many people with food allergies are probably still undiagnosed because of the indifference and carelessness of the average doctor
, well, my educated guess is more like 20-30% of the general population has food allergies.I have seen you mention that book before, and I wrote down the name, but I didn't buy it yet because I don't have time to read anything right now - but I'm putting it at higher priority, I didn't realize it would apply specifically to me. I've done pretty well finding allergic and trigger foods on my own (I'm proud!), but I've had flare-ups the past few weeks from stress as far as I can tell, although I'm still testing stevia. I wondered if I had a delayed or buildup reaction to it, I'm going to stay off it 2 weeks, then try eating it every day for a while, I may have to do that several times to know for sure. It doesn't behave like my other trigger foods, with pain right after I eat it. However, now that I understand better the connection with allergies, it may be the flare-ups are related to that because my inhalant allergies are even worse than usual this year. I'm glad you think my symptoms are manageable - other than dietary changes with meds as needed, I also have a HEPA air purifier, which prevents me from waking up with headaches. Do you have any further suggestions on managing my symptoms? This is my favorite time of year for being outside, cool breezes, blue sky, fall colors
, I take plenty of allergy meds.Thanks again
[This message has been edited by Julia37 (edited 10-10-2001).]
 

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JULIA....A review of about a decade of studies of various forms of immunomodulating supplements like traditional herbals. extracts, with all manner of content, as well as recent personal experiences suggests that there are one or more OTC formulations which may help reduce your symptoms and your drug use. From these, certain of the long chain fatty acids have been shown to stabilize immunocytes through various mechanisms. The one you see advertised on this Board (IBSACOL) has so far been helpful to myself and several of our LEAP patients who have begun taking it under casually controlled conditions (they know their food intolerances from testing so they know exactly which foods to oral challenge after they have been on it awhile so they can guage the degree of oral tolerance regained). It is very promising in my opinion. You may wish to try this yourself. Gotta haul butt nowLaterMNL______________ www.leapallergy.com
 

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JULIA....A review of about a decade of studies of various forms of immunomodulating supplements like traditional herbals. extracts, with all manner of content, as well as recent personal experiences suggests that there are one or more OTC formulations which may help reduce your symptoms and your drug use. From these, certain of the long chain fatty acids have been shown to stabilize immunocytes through various mechanisms. The one you see advertised on this Board (IBSACOL) has so far been helpful to myself and several of our LEAP patients who have begun taking it under casually controlled conditions (they know their food intolerances from testing so they know exactly which foods to oral challenge after they have been on it awhile so they can guage the degree of oral tolerance regained). It is very promising in my opinion. You may wish to try this yourself. Gotta haul butt nowLaterMNL______________ www.leapallergy.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I didn't know IBSACOL is a supplement! I thought it was a drug from what I'd seen here. There's so much discussion of drugs, I don't usually pay attention since I have Rx that works at least for now.Personally I don't know if I'll re-test my intolerant foods, I just want the random symptoms (triggered by allergies?) to go away.I looked at the ad and e-mailed them to ask if it contains any soy products. We'll see.Thanks
[This message has been edited by Julia37 (edited 10-11-2001).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I didn't know IBSACOL is a supplement! I thought it was a drug from what I'd seen here. There's so much discussion of drugs, I don't usually pay attention since I have Rx that works at least for now.Personally I don't know if I'll re-test my intolerant foods, I just want the random symptoms (triggered by allergies?) to go away.I looked at the ad and e-mailed them to ask if it contains any soy products. We'll see.Thanks
[This message has been edited by Julia37 (edited 10-11-2001).]
 
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