Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Digestive Health Support Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have experience with a post-surgery condition called illeus?And if so, do you know if treatment for sameis similar to IBS-C? I can find no information and have a family member inextreme distress, being discharged from hospital with this. And help or information will be greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,955 Posts
I don't think it sounds like IBS-C at all based on what I read in Merck.The constipation of IBS-C is relatively harmless, Ileus sounds like a fairly serious complication that can come from surgery.see http://www.merck.com/pubs/mmanual/section3/chapter25/25c.htm for the really technical stuffThe following is partway down a less technical discussion of Abdominal Emergancies (while IBS-C may be uncomfortable it never is an abdominal emergancy) http://www.merck.com/pubs/mmanual_home/sec9/112.htm
quote:IleusIleus (paralytic ileus, adynamic ileus) is a condition in which the normal contractile movements of the intestinal wall temporarily stop.Like a mechanical obstruction, ileus prevents the passage of intestinal contents. Unlike a mechanical obstruction, though, ileus rarely leads to perforation.Ileus may be caused by an infection or a blood clot inside the abdomen, atherosclerosis that reduces the blood supply to the intestine, or an injury to an intestinal artery or vein. Ileus also may be caused by disorders outside the intestine, such as kidney failure or abnormal levels of blood electrolytes--low potassium or high calcium levels, for example. Other causes of ileus are certain drugs and an underactive thyroid gland. Ileus is common for 24 to 72 hours after abdominal surgery.Symptoms and DiagnosisThe symptoms of ileus are abdominal bloating, vomiting, severe constipation, and cramps. A doctor hears few bowel sounds or none at all through a stethoscope. An x-ray of the abdomen shows bulging loops of intestine. Occasionally, a colonoscopy (an examination of the colon using a viewing tube) (see page 485 in Chapter 100, Diagnostic Tests for Digestive Disorders) is performed to evaluate the situation.TreatmentThe buildup of gas and liquid caused by ileus must be relieved. Sometimes a tube is passed into the large intestine through the anus to relieve the pressure. In addition, a tube is passed through the nose into the stomach or small intestine, and suction is applied to relieve pressure and distention. The person may not eat or drink anything until the crisis is over. Fluids and electrolytes are given intravenously.
For IBS C the treatment is more fiber, more water and maybe some laxatives or increasing foods or supplements that tend to loosen stools. None of the "not eating or drinking anything until the crisis is over" kinda thing.If they have been released one would think the crisis is past. I would talk to the doctor about what sort of things should be done in recovering from this sort of emergancy (I would imagine the intestines might be a bit bunged up afterwards and you may need to eat soft easy to digest foods for awhile depending on how bunged up you got from the blockage. Total blockage of the intestines is NOT typical of IBS-C, although some people with IBS (of any kind) may get obstructions or psuedo-obstructions and in those cases it is a GI emergancy for us just like anybody else who gets them IBS or no). And if they are still in distress I would take them right back to the hospital as this doesn't sound like something you want to mess around with at home.K.------------------I have no financial, academic, or any other stake in any commercial product mentioned by me.My story and what worked for me in greatly easing my IBS: http://www.ibsgroup.org/ubb/Forum17/HTML/000015.html [This message has been edited by kmottus (edited 07-23-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,955 Posts
I don't think it sounds like IBS-C at all based on what I read in Merck.The constipation of IBS-C is relatively harmless, Ileus sounds like a fairly serious complication that can come from surgery.see http://www.merck.com/pubs/mmanual/section3/chapter25/25c.htm for the really technical stuffThe following is partway down a less technical discussion of Abdominal Emergancies (while IBS-C may be uncomfortable it never is an abdominal emergancy) http://www.merck.com/pubs/mmanual_home/sec9/112.htm
quote:IleusIleus (paralytic ileus, adynamic ileus) is a condition in which the normal contractile movements of the intestinal wall temporarily stop.Like a mechanical obstruction, ileus prevents the passage of intestinal contents. Unlike a mechanical obstruction, though, ileus rarely leads to perforation.Ileus may be caused by an infection or a blood clot inside the abdomen, atherosclerosis that reduces the blood supply to the intestine, or an injury to an intestinal artery or vein. Ileus also may be caused by disorders outside the intestine, such as kidney failure or abnormal levels of blood electrolytes--low potassium or high calcium levels, for example. Other causes of ileus are certain drugs and an underactive thyroid gland. Ileus is common for 24 to 72 hours after abdominal surgery.Symptoms and DiagnosisThe symptoms of ileus are abdominal bloating, vomiting, severe constipation, and cramps. A doctor hears few bowel sounds or none at all through a stethoscope. An x-ray of the abdomen shows bulging loops of intestine. Occasionally, a colonoscopy (an examination of the colon using a viewing tube) (see page 485 in Chapter 100, Diagnostic Tests for Digestive Disorders) is performed to evaluate the situation.TreatmentThe buildup of gas and liquid caused by ileus must be relieved. Sometimes a tube is passed into the large intestine through the anus to relieve the pressure. In addition, a tube is passed through the nose into the stomach or small intestine, and suction is applied to relieve pressure and distention. The person may not eat or drink anything until the crisis is over. Fluids and electrolytes are given intravenously.
For IBS C the treatment is more fiber, more water and maybe some laxatives or increasing foods or supplements that tend to loosen stools. None of the "not eating or drinking anything until the crisis is over" kinda thing.If they have been released one would think the crisis is past. I would talk to the doctor about what sort of things should be done in recovering from this sort of emergancy (I would imagine the intestines might be a bit bunged up afterwards and you may need to eat soft easy to digest foods for awhile depending on how bunged up you got from the blockage. Total blockage of the intestines is NOT typical of IBS-C, although some people with IBS (of any kind) may get obstructions or psuedo-obstructions and in those cases it is a GI emergancy for us just like anybody else who gets them IBS or no). And if they are still in distress I would take them right back to the hospital as this doesn't sound like something you want to mess around with at home.K.------------------I have no financial, academic, or any other stake in any commercial product mentioned by me.My story and what worked for me in greatly easing my IBS: http://www.ibsgroup.org/ubb/Forum17/HTML/000015.html [This message has been edited by kmottus (edited 07-23-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
Hi LML. I wanted to add my few cents to this. I have had IBS-D with pain for 7 years now and in May I had a total hysterectomy. 2 days after the surgery I developed an Ileus. It is in no way similar to the feelings of ibs. The ileus is much much much more painful and actually fatal. My doctor told me that if I didn't complain as much as I did in the hospital about feeling soooo sick and in so much pain they probably wouldn't have caught it in time and I would have died due to my intestines splitting open. I came really close. And while they did not put any tube in my butt they did put one through my nose down to my stomach. I screamed bloody hell during that it was so painful. Had to have it in for 24 hours. I guess what happened is my digestive/intestinal system shut down and I couldn't absorb anything so liquids and pain meds weren't helping any in recovery period and the contents of the small intestines actually start to back up into the stomach causing severe pain and bloating and nausea. Not fun at all. So I guess maybe I answered your question about if there is any similarity. Believe me, there isn't. Take care,Sandi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
Hi LML. I wanted to add my few cents to this. I have had IBS-D with pain for 7 years now and in May I had a total hysterectomy. 2 days after the surgery I developed an Ileus. It is in no way similar to the feelings of ibs. The ileus is much much much more painful and actually fatal. My doctor told me that if I didn't complain as much as I did in the hospital about feeling soooo sick and in so much pain they probably wouldn't have caught it in time and I would have died due to my intestines splitting open. I came really close. And while they did not put any tube in my butt they did put one through my nose down to my stomach. I screamed bloody hell during that it was so painful. Had to have it in for 24 hours. I guess what happened is my digestive/intestinal system shut down and I couldn't absorb anything so liquids and pain meds weren't helping any in recovery period and the contents of the small intestines actually start to back up into the stomach causing severe pain and bloating and nausea. Not fun at all. So I guess maybe I answered your question about if there is any similarity. Believe me, there isn't. Take care,Sandi
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top