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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am lactose intolerant along with the IBS. I am taking Tums EX for calcium. I am finding that tums is really making me constipated which I don't need because I have the spastic constipating type of IBS already. I am going to talk to my doctor about this and see what else I can take for a calcium supplement. Is anybody taking TUMS and do you find it is constipating?
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Ros,Why do you need to take calcium? Why not take it as part of a multi-vitamin with calcium in it. Calcium contracts your muscles that's why you are suffering. You need to be taking magnesium along with it, it relaxes the muscles. You can take as much as 1000 mg. a day, you need to regulate according to your "stools". If it's too loose, then you take less. Getting my information from a booklet purchased over the internet. This girl totally got rid of her IBS. Got it on http://www.fibrocure.com.[/URL] It's pretty informative, lots more stuff in there too, it's also about Fibromyalgia but a lot of people who have Fibro, have IBS. Haven't finsihed reading it yet, but it's the first thing I've read that's making a lot of sense.Casey
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ros,Forgot to mention, I don't know if this is helpful or not, I have a "healthy" daughter except for the fact that she too is lactose intolerant. She has to take acidophilus regularly, plus she eats a lot of yogurt, something to do with friendly bacteria. Info like this also in the book I mentioned earlier.Good luckCasey
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
JeanMagnesium in not toxic over 600 mg, you can take 1000 mg. with no problem, I do it all the time. Got the info from "Women's Health Secrets", which talks about the large calcium hoax foisted on the American public, plus I also read it in another book, that's where I got the idea in the first place, I definitely wouldn't take that much without getting advice from somewhere, my doctor says it'sokay. If you get Diarrhea from it, you cut back the next day. It varies for everyone and no, not everyone will be able to handle 1000, some may only be able to handle 400, as I said earlier you learn to regulate what's right for your body. Believe me, it works great!Casey
 

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Hi Casey:This is an article from webmd.com. It does not mention the levels at which magnesium is toxic, but does give the RDA's and tells the signs to watch out for and call your doc. Among them is D. The url for the article is: http://my.webmd.com/content/article/3187.10565 Magnesium What It Is Magnesium is one of the minerals that we require in relatively large amounts. It is particularly abundant in green vegetables, and is also available in natural supplements--some of which require a physician's prescription. What It Does Magnesium plays many roles in the body. It promotes absorption and use of other minerals such as calcium, helps move sodium and potassium across the cell membranes; is involved in the metabolism of proteins, and turns on essential enzymes. Why You Need It Magnesium helps bones grow and teeth remain strong. It enables nerve impulses to travel through the body, keeps the body's metabolism in balance, and helps the muscles--including the heart--work properly. Small amounts of magnesium work as an antacid; large amounts of magnesium work as a laxative. Can You Take Too Much? Although magnesium toxicity is rare, it can lead to serious problems, including severe nausea and vomiting, extreme muscle weakness, and difficulty breathing. The blood pressure can drop to an extremely low level, and the heartbeat may become irregular. If your heartbeat seems irregular, seek emergency medical treatment immediately. Stop taking magnesium supplements and call your doctor if you notice any of the other signs of potential magnesium toxicity. You should also tell your physician if you lose your appetite, develop diarrhea, abdominal pain, mood changes, fatigue, or weakness; or if you experience discomfort when you urinate. Recommended Daily Allowances ADULTS Males 11 to 14 years: 350 milligrams Males 15 to 18 years: 400 milligrams Males 18 and older: 350 milligrams Females 11 and older: 300 milligrams Women require an additional 150 milligrams of magnesium each day during pregnancy and while breastfeeding an infant. However, it is best to get the extra amount through your diet. Experts advise against taking magnesium supplements during pregnancy--the risk to the developing baby outweighs any benefits of supplementation. You should also avoid taking large quantities of magnesium while you are breastfeeding. If magnesium supplements are necessary, your physician will recommend that you stop breastfeeding. CHILDREN Infants up to 6 months: 50 milligrams Ages 6 to 12 months: 70 milligrams Ages 1 to 3 years: 150 milligrams Ages 4 to 6 years: 200 milligrams Ages 7 to 10 years: 250 milligrams Best Dietary Sources Many foods are rich in magnesium. Good sources include fish and seafood, including bluefish, carp, cod, flounder, halibut, herring, mackerel, ocean perch, shrimp, and swordfish; fruits and fruit juice; leafy green vegetables; dairy products; nuts, including almonds; molasses; soybeans; sunflower seeds; wheat germ; and snails. One-half cup of dry soybeans contains 278 milligrams of magnesium; 1/2 pound of spinach provides 200 milligrams. One-half of a medium avocado contains 51 milligrams; 1 cup of bottled grape juice has 30 milligrams, a cup of skim milk or buttermilk 34 milligrams, a cup of ice cream 19 milligrams.
 

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I have had to take calcium for bone thinning due to IBS-C & consequent weight loss. Tums is calcium carbonate, which is great for soaking up stomach acid, but not so great for us constipatees. I found that calcium citrate was a lot less constipating - but more expensive. best of luck
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the advice. I am going to order the book Fibro Cure? right away. I am going to stop the Tums. I am totally plugged up. I will take a trip to the Health Food Store and try to find a citrate supplement. Have a nice day.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
hello....OsCal is calcium citrate and was given to me when I was pregnant. It does not constipate. gentle on the system and yes a bit more expensive but worth.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
JeanGThanks for ALL that info, I'm not so sure how seriously we should take RDA's tho'. There has been a lot of info out there to dispute them. I too have references.Dr. Julian Whitaker "Supplementing your diet with magnesium is safe and inexpensive and addresses one of basic problems of diabetics. I recommend 1,000 to 1,200 mg. of magnesium a day....if you are taking another multi-vitamin, just supplement the difference to achieve the higher lever.."Dr. Wm. Campbell Douglass "For blood pressure reduction, magnesium is hard to beat. Many physcians prefer it to prescription drugs and, OF COURSE, EVEN AT LEVELS OF 1000 mg. PER DAY-HAS NO SIDE EFFECTS".From the Giant Book of Women's Health Secrets is this:How Much Magnesium?How much magnesium does your body need? According to Dr. Mildred Seelig, executive president of the American College of Nutrition, we need about 200 mg. more that we get in an average diet. She suggests that geriatric patients on a good diet take between 700 and 800 mg. of magnesium supplements each day. This is considerably more that the RDA of 350 mg per day for women of all ages.Can you take too much magnesium? It's unlikely, according to Dr. Melvyn R. Werback, MD. author of Healing Throught Nutrition. His research into medical studies has not found ANY cases of MAGNESIUM TOXICITY from taking itin the form of oral supplementation.Guy E. Abraham, MD., a research gynecologist and endocrinologist in Torrance, California, has given postmenopausal women from 200 to 1000 mg. of magnesium to strength their bones. HE BASED THE AMOUNT HE GAVE EACH WOMAN ON BOWEL TOLERANCE-ENOUGH MAGNESIUM TO CAUSE SOFT STOOLS, BUT NOT DIARRHEA."I apologize for going on and on,but I would not offer any info that could harm someone. No, not everyone can tolerate 1000 mg. a day but I did state earlier you must adjust it to suit your own bowel tolerance. For me, it's 1000 mg. a day, then sometimes I have to cut back to 400 mg. a day. So far everything I've read shows Magnesium is safe without any danger of it being toxic.Casey
 

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Here's another more detailed article on Magnesium from Webmd.com. It mentions the health conditions under which you should not take magnesium without consulting your doctor, ie heart and kidney problems. It also mentions some medications which you do not want to take magnesium with. This article covers magnesium supplements and injectable magnesium. The url to the article is: http://my.webmd.com/content/asset/uspdi.202644 MAGNESIUM SUPPLEMENTS (Systemic)Brand Names | Category | Description | Importance of Diet | Before Using This Dietary Supplement | Proper Use of This Dietary Supplement Some commonly used brand names are: In the U.S.�Almora 4 Chloromag 1 Citroma 2 Concentrated Phillips' Milk of Magnesia 5 Mag-200 7 Mag-L-100 1 Magonate 4 Mag-Ox 400 7 Mag-Tab SR 6 Magtrate 4 Maox 7 MGP 4 Phillips' Chewable Tablets 5 Phillips' Milk of Magnesia 5 Slow-Mag 1 Uro-Mag 7 In Canada�Citro-Mag 2 Mag 2 8 Maglucate 4 Magnesium-Rougier 3 Phillips' Magnesia Tablets 5 Phillips' Milk of Magnesia 5 Note: For quick reference, the following magnesium supplements are numbered to match the corresponding brand names. This information applies to the following: 1. Magnesium Chloride (mag-NEE-zhum KLOR-ide) ** *** 2. Magnesium Citrate# (mag-NEE-zhum SIH-trayt) *** 3. Magnesium Gluceptate (mag-NEE-zhum gloo-SEP-tate)* 4. Magnesium Gluconate (mag-NEE-zhum GLOO-ko-nate) *** 5. Magnesium Hydroxide# ** ** (mag-NEE-zhum hye-DROX-ide) *** 6. Magnesium Lactate (mag-NEE-zhum LAK-tate) ** 7. Magnesium Oxide# (mag-NEE-zhum OX-ide) *** **** 8. Magnesium Pidolate (mag-NEE-zhum PID-o-late)* 9. Magnesium Sulfate#** (mag-NEE-zhum SUL-fate) *** **** * Not commercially available in the U.S. ** Not commercially available in Canada *** Generic name product may be available in the U.S. **** Generic name product may be available in Canada # See Laxatives (Oral) for laxative use of magnesium citrate, magnesium hydroxide, magnesium oxide, and magnesium sulfate.** See Magnesium Sulfate (Systemic) for use in seizures and uterine tetany.** ** See Antacids (Oral) for antacid use of magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Category Antihypomagnesemic�Magnesium Chloride; Magnesium Citrate; Magnesium Gluceptate; Magnesium Gluconate; Magnesium Hydroxide; Magnesium Lactate; Magnesium Oxide; Magnesium Pidolate; Magnesium Sulfate Electrolyte replenisher�Magnesium Chloride; Magnesium Sulfate Nutritional supplement, mineral�Magnesium Chloride; Magnesium Citrate; Magnesium Gluceptate; Magnesium Gluconate; Magnesium Hydroxide; Magnesium Lactate; Magnesium Oxide; Magnesium Pidolate; Magnesium Sulfate --------------------------------------------------------------------------------Description Magnesium is used as a dietary supplement for individuals who are deficient in magnesium. Although a balanced diet usually supplies all the magnesium a person needs, magnesium supplements may be needed by patients who have lost magnesium because of illness or treatment with certain medicines.Lack of magnesium may lead to irritability, muscle weakness, and irregular heartbeat.Injectable magnesium is given only by or under the supervision of a health care professional. Some oral magnesium preparations are available only with a prescription. Others are available without a prescription.Magnesium supplements are available in the following dosage forms:Oral Magnesium Chloride Tablets (U.S.) Enteric-coated tablets (U.S.) Extended-release tablets (U.S.) Magnesium Citrate Oral solution (U.S. and Canada) Magnesium Gluceptate Oral solution (Canada) Magnesium Gluconate Oral solution (U.S.) Tablets (U.S. and Canada) Magnesium Hydroxide Tablets (U.S.) Chewable tablets (U.S. and Canada) Oral solution (U.S. and Canada) Magnesium Lactate Extended-release tablets (U.S.) Magnesium Oxide Capsules (U.S.) Tablets (U.S. and Canada) Magnesium Pidolate Powder for oral solution (Canada) Magnesium Sulfate Crystals (U.S.) Parenteral Magnesium Chloride Injection (U.S.) Magnesium Sulfate Injection (U.S. and Canada) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------Before Using This Dietary Supplement If you are taking this dietary supplement without a prescription, carefully read and follow any precautions on the label. For magnesium supplements, the following should be considered:Allergies�Tell your health care professional if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to magnesium. Also tell your health care professional if you are allergic to any other substances, such as foods, preservatives, or dyes.Pregnancy�It is especially important that you are receiving enough vitamins and minerals when you become pregnant and that you continue to receive the right amount of vitamins and minerals throughout your pregnancy. The healthy growth and development of the fetus depend on a steady supply of nutrients from the mother. However, taking large amounts of dietary supplements during pregnancy may be harmful to the mother and/or fetus and should be avoided.Breast-feeding�It is especially important that you receive the right amount of vitamins and minerals so that your baby will also get the vitamins and minerals needed to grow properly. However, taking large amounts of a dietary supplement while breast-feeding may be harmful to the mother and/or baby and should be avoided.Children�Problems in children have not been reported with intake of normal daily recommended amounts.Older adults�Problems in older adults have not been reported with intake of normal daily recommended amounts.Studies have shown that older adults may have lower blood levels of magnesium than younger adults. Your health care professional may recommend that you take a magnesium supplement.Medicines or other dietary supplements�Although certain medicines or other dietary supplements should not be used together at all, in other cases they may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your health care professional may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking magnesium, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following:Cellulose sodium phosphate�Use with magnesium supplements may prevent cellulose sodium phosphate from working properly; magnesium supplements should be taken at least 1 hour before or after cellulose sodium phosphate Magnesium-containing preparations, other, including magnesium enemas�Use with magnesium supplements may cause high blood levels of magnesium, which may increase the chance of side effects Sodium polystyrene sulfonate�Use with magnesium supplements may cause the magnesium supplement to be less effective Tetracyclines, oral�Use with magnesium supplements may prevent the tetracycline from working properly; magnesium supplements should be taken at least 1 to 3 hours before or after oral tetracycline Other medical problems�The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of magnesium. Make sure you tell your health care professional if you have any other medical problems, especially:Heart disease�Magnesium supplements may make this condition worse Kidney problems�Magnesium supplements may increase the risk of hypermagnesemia (too much magnesium in the blood), which could cause serious side effects; your health care professional may need to change your dose --------------------------------------------------------------------------------Proper Use Dosing�The amount of magnesium needed to meet normal daily recommended intakes will be different for different patients. The following information includes only the average amounts of magnesium.For oral dosage form (capsules, chewable tablets, crystals for oral solution, extended-release tablets, enteric-coated tablets, powder for oral solution, tablets, oral solution): To prevent deficiency, the amount taken by mouth is based on normal daily recommended intakes (Note that the normal daily recommended intakes are expressed as an actual amount of magnesium. The salt form [e.g., magnesium chloride, magnesium gluconate, etc.] has a different strength.): For the U.S. Adult and teenage males�270 to 400 milligrams (mg) per day. Adult and teenage females�280 to 300 mg per day. Pregnant females�320 mg per day. Breast-feeding females�340 to 355 mg per day. Children 7 to 10 years of age�170 mg per day. Children 4 to 6 years of age�120 mg per day. Children birth to 3 years of age�40 to 80 mg per day. For Canada Adult and teenage males�130 to 250 mg per day. Adult and teenage females�135 to 210 mg per day. Pregnant females�195 to 245 mg per day. Breast-feeding females�245 to 265 mg per day. Children 7 to 10 years of age�100 to 135 mg per day. Children 4 to 6 years of age�65 mg per day. Children birth to 3 years of age�20 to 50 mg per day. To treat deficiency: Adults, teenagers, and children�Treatment dose is determined by prescriber for each individual based on severity of deficiency. Magnesium supplements should be taken with meals. Taking magnesium supplements on an empty stomach may cause diarrhea.For individuals taking the extended-release form of this dietary supplement:Swallow the tablets whole. Do not chew or suck on the tablet. Some tablets may be broken or crushed and sprinkled on applesauce or other soft food. However, check with your health care professional first, since this should not be done for most tablets. For individuals taking the powder form of this dietary supplement:pour powder into a glass. Add water and stir. Missed dose�If you miss taking your magnesium supplement for one or more days there is no cause for concern, since it takes some time for your body to become seriously low in magnesium. However, if your health care professional has recommended that you take magnesium, try to remember to take it as directed every day.Storage�To store this dietary supplement:Keep out of the reach of children. Store away from heat and direct light. Do not store in the bathroom, near the kitchen sink, or in other damp places. Heat or moisture may cause the dietary supplement to break down. Keep the dietary supplement from freezing. Do not refrigerate. Do not keep dietary supplements that are outdated or are no longer needed. Be sure that any discarded dietary supplement is out of the reach of children. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------Side Effects Along with its needed effects, a dietary supplement may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.Check with your health care professional immediately if any of the following side effects occur:Rare (with injectable magnesium only)Dizziness or fainting; flushing; irritation and pain at injection site�for intramuscular administration only; muscle paralysis; troubled breathingSymptoms of overdose (rare in individuals with normal kidney function)Blurred or double vision; coma; dizziness or fainting; drowsiness (severe); increased or decreased urination; slow heartbeat; troubled breathingOther side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. However, check with your health care professional if the following side effect continues or is bothersome:Less common (with oral magnesium)DiarrheaOther side effects not listed above may also occur in some individuals. If you notice any other effects, check with your health care professional.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Importance of Diet For good health, it is important that you eat a balanced and varied diet. Follow carefully any diet program your health care professional may recommend. For your specific dietary vitamin and/or mineral needs, ask your health care professional for a list of appropriate foods. If you think that you are not getting enough vitamins and/or minerals in your diet, you may choose to take a dietary supplement. The best dietary sources of magnesium include green leafy vegetables, nuts, peas, beans, and cereal grains in which the germ or outer layers have not been removed. Hard water has been found to contain more magnesium than soft water. A diet high in fat may cause less magnesium to be absorbed. Cooking may decrease the magnesium content of food.The daily amount of magnesium needed is defined in several different ways.For U.S.� Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) are the amount of vitamins and minerals needed to provide for adequate nutrition in most healthy persons. RDAs for a given nutrient may vary depending on a person's age, sex, and physical condition (e.g., pregnancy). Daily Values (DVs) are used on food and dietary supplement labels to indicate the percent of the recommended daily amount of each nutrient that a serving provides. DV replaces the previous designation of United States Recommended Daily Allowances (USRDAs). For Canada� Recommended Nutrient Intakes (RNIs) are used to determine the amounts of vitamins, minerals, and protein needed to provide adequate nutrition and lessen the risk of chronic disease. Normal daily recommended intakes in milligrams (mg) for magnesium are generally defined as follows:persons U.S.(mg) Canada(mg) Infants and childrenBirth to 3 years of age 40-80 20-50 4 to 6 years of age 120 65 7 to 10 years of age 170 100-135 Adolescent and adult males 270-400 130-250 Adolescent and adult females 280-300 135-210 Pregnant females 320 195-245 Breast-feeding females 340-355 245-265
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
JeanGI have SO many articles on the benefits of magnesium. Did you know that some EMTs and hospitals give you an I.V. of magnesium immediately upon having a heart attack? Why, because it limits the amount of damage done to your heart. It stablizes heart palpitations, flutters and a racing heart, you need 500-100O mg. for that.Magnesium deficiencies can cause electrical changes in your heart muscle.Magnesium causes muscles to relax, while calcium causes them to contract. A proper balance of calcium and magnesium keeps the heart muscle working properly, an excess of calcium can cause muscles to contract too much--leading to the muscle spasms we know as a heart attack. That's why the most widely prescribed heart medications are-calcium channel blockers that prevent calcium from entering your heart!That sounds good to me! All the above have come from different sources and none of it is my opinion.Why don't we just agree to do what works for us and leave it at that. It works for myself and my entire family and I wouldn't do anything to harm them. Casey
 
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