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Hi tom ...I've taken the amino acid L-tyrosine for many years as a preventative for psoriasis. Also, I know exactly when I need to top up with supplementation because I can feel my mind getting heavy and depressed, for no reason other than I need more tyrosine. Fixes it in a day or so... simple. I'm vegetarian for nearly 30 years now and I need extra tyrosine... but also meat-eaters can be affected by low tyrosine levels. I've often handed on this suggestion to others who have experienced excellent relief from depression and anxiety with tyrosinesupplementation.Pretty much it's extremely safe with a few precautions such as high blood pressure, hyperthyroidism and some other specifics. If you are taking specific anti-depression meds like SSRI's and MAO inhibitors you should not take it. But always check with your doctor or licensed practitioner first.( See the list below my signature)There are dozens of references out there for it -- here are just a few. ( There are others on the board who are better at finding research than I am.) I highly recommend it for anyone who suffers anxiety and depression and who talks with their doctor or professional first -- amazing to know these problems can be fixed nutritionally !!!!I know it has helped me for many, many years. Hope this doesn't get flamed ... but hey, I'll keep my fire extinguisher handy !Good luck Tom.Gentle thoughts to you all ...Dianne --------------------------------------------L-Tyrosine is an amino acid. Your body uses it to produce dopamine norepinephrine (noradrenaline) epinephrine (adrenaline) These are some of the main neurotransmitters in the brain. Attention deficit disorder can be caused by not enough dopamine or norepinephrine. Low levels of tyrosine, therefore, can result in ADD.What happens in this case is that the neo-cortex of the brain basically shuts down. This is the part of the brain that allows you to pay attention. Without enough dopamine and norepinephrine, all the effort in the world won't help much.That is why tyrosine is important. More tyrosine means more dopamine and norepinephrine. As a result, the neo-cortex can now function properly, and you can pay attention.L-Tyrosine can also be helpful for people with chronic fatigue narcolepsy anxiety depression low sex drive allergies headaches1 L-tyrosine aids in the functions of the adrenal, thyroid and pituitary glands. It is converted into thyroid hormone, or thyroxin,"which plays an important role in controlling metabolic rate, skin health, mental health, and growth rate. Tyrosine is specifically used to treat depression because it is a precursor for those neurotransmitters that are responsible for transmitting nerve impulses and essential for preventing depression."2Amino acids are the 20 building blocks of protein. Some amino acids are essential, and others are non-essential. Essential means that your body cannot produce them and so you must get them from your diet. Non-essential amino acids can be produced by your body from the essential amino acids.L-Tyrosine is a non-essential amino acid for most people, because your body can produce it from phenylalanine. (Some people have a genetic disease called phenylketonuria, or PKU, which prevents their bodies from converting phenylalanine into tyrosine.)Amino acids come in two forms, L- and D-, which are mirror images of each other. The L- form is found in food, and is generally the form used in our bodies.You can get some tyrosine in your diet, from such foods as fish poultry almonds avocados bananas dairy products lima beans pumpkin seeds sesame seeds3 Although tyrosine can be produced in our bodies, the question is whether you have enough tyrosine in your body to produce sufficient quantities of neurotransmitters.People who have ADD/ADHD, that is, inattentive or hyperactive ADD, may wish to take extra tyrosine, either from their diet or in the form of supplements, to increase their dopamine and norepinephrine.Who should avoid tyrosineBefore discussing how much tyrosine to take, you must be aware that tyrosine must be avoided if you are taking monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors tricyclic anti-depressants serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as Prozac Also avoid tyrosine if you are taking other pharmaceutical drugs used to treat mental or emotional conditions, such as depression.Avoid tyrosine if you have high blood pressure, muscular dystrophy or cancer, especially malignant melanoma.Avoid tyrosine if you are subject to heart palpitations.If you have a thyroid condition, such as hypo-thyroidism, don't take tyrosine without first consulting your doctor.If you have glaucoma, discuss the use of tyrosine with your doctor. Tyrosine is a stimulant (since it produces dopamine), and other stimulant drugs, such as Ritalin, are not to be taken if you have glaucoma.Dosages and Side EffectsTyrosine comes in tablets of 100 mg or 500 mg, or in powder form.According to Dr. Ray Sahelian, M.D., if you are taking supplemental tyrosine, you should start with 50 mg and slowly work your way up to higher levels. Observe very carefully what effects it is having, beneficial or otherwise. Discontinue if it causes irritation, anxiety or digestive problems.4Dr. Sahelian warns to be careful of your dosage of tyrosine if you are taking other stimulants. The effects of stimulants can be cumulative. He mentions DMAE, CDP-choline, pantothenic acid, methyl donors, ALC, CoQ10, DHEA, pregnenolone, St. John's wort, and ginseng.5Tyrosine supplements should be taken either on an empty stomach, with water, or with carbohydrate meals. This is so it doesn't have to compete for absorption with other amino acids, from protein food.According to Leon Chaitow, N.D., D.O.,"A high protein meal will increase blood and brain tyrosine to a degree but not enough to effect neurotransmitter synthesis greatly."6"Tyrosine has been found to be most effective when there exists a deficiency state. Patients who have previously responded to amphetamines may respond well to tyrosine therapy."7"small doses of tyrosine are more effective in increasing brain levels of neurotransmitters than large doses. Although blood and brain levels of tyrosine will increase with large doses, there appears to be an inhibition of the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase which converts tyrosine to neurotransmitters, when large amounts of tyrosine are present."8The Life Extension Foundation (LEF) suggests a daily dosage of L-Tyrosine of from 500 mg to 1500 mg, to fight depression.9 Presumably, in recommending such dosages, they are thinking of adults, not children.The editors of The Natural Pharmacy point out that clinical studies in which tyrosine was used for a variety of conditions involved dosages of up to 7 grams (7000 mg). They add that it is unclear if such large dosages are necessary.10LEF points out that clinical studies in which blood levels of subjects were raised to three times the level of controls were not accompanied by any evidence of side effects.11According to The Natural Pharmacy,"Tyrosine is not generally associated with side effects. Vitamin B6, folic acid and copper are necessary for conversion of tyrosine into neurotransmitters."12Contrast that with the side effect profiles of pharmacological stimulants, not to mention their cost, and L-Tyrosine looks like a safe, natural and cost-conscious alternative.Notes:1. Prescription for Nutritional Healing, third edition, by Phyllis Balch, CNC, and James F. Balch, M.D., Avery, 2000, pp. 51-2.2. Disease Prevention and Treatment, third edition, Melanie Segala, ed., published by the Life Extension Foundation, 2000, p. 536.3. Balch, p. 52.4. Mind Boosters, by Dr. Ray Sahelian, M.D., St. Martin's Griffin, 2000, pp. 142-3.5. Sahelian, p. 142.6. Thorson's Guide to Amino Acids, by Leon Chaitow, Thorson's, 1991, pp. 73-4.7. Chaitow, p. 74.8. Chaitow, p. 74.9. Segala, p. 235.10. The Natural Pharmacy, by Schuyler Lininger et al., Healthnotes Inc., 1999, p. 335. 11. Segala, p. 537.12. Lininger et al., p. 335. Tyrosine hydroxylase gene associated with depressive symptomatology in mood disorder bySerretti A, Macciardi F, Verga M, Cusin C, Pedrini S, Smeraldi EIstituto Scientifico H. San Raffaele, Department of Neuroscience,University of Milano School of Medicine, Milan, Italy.Connecticut Mental Health Center, Department of Psychiatry,Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven 06519, USA.robert.berman###yale.edu Am J Med Genet 1998 Mar 28; 81(2):127-30 ABSTRACTTyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine and norepinephrine. It may be involved in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders and positive associations have been reported for TH gene markers in mood disorders. While most replications failed to confirm the initial findings, other papers suggested a potential role of this gene in the etiology of mood disorders. Among the many different reasons for a lack of consistent replications, a critical role is played by the "correct" phenotype identification. Actually, up to now the only classification criteria has been the psychiatric diagnosis, but within the same psychiatric diagnoses the symptomatologic presentation may vary dramatically depending upon severity, presence of psychotic features or other psychopathologic traits. Thus, the aim of our study is to evaluate a possible association for TH gene with symptomatology in a sample of subjects affected by mood disorders. We have developed a phenotype definition based on the observed symptomatology divided into the four factors "Excitement," "Depression," "Delusion," and "Disorganization." Our sample includes 46 mood disorder subjects, investigated by the OPCRIT (operational criteria checklist for psychotic illness) checklist for their symptomatological pattern and typed for TH variants by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Depressive factor was associated with TH variants (F = 4.79, df = 4, 87, P = 0.006), with TH*2 subjects presenting lower depressive scores. Subjects with genotype TH*2/2 were the only ones in the sample to report mild depressive episodes. TH variants may be related with depressive symptomatology in subjects affected by mood disorders. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Tyrosine is not an essential amino acid, as it is sythesised in the body, from phenylalanine. Like phenylaalanine, tyrosine is intimately involved with the important brain neurotransmitters epinephine, norepinephrine, and dopamine. Animals subjected to stress in the laboratory have been found to have reduced levels of norepinephrine. ( Comment from Dianne : poor little sods.)Treating with tyrosine prior to stressing the animals prevents reduction of this neurotransmitter. Findings such as these led to human tyrosine experiments in which soldiers undergoing various forms of stress were given tyrosine to see what effect it might have on their performance. In one of these ecperiments, conditions were created that simulated a rapid ascent to 15,500 feet. This dramatically stresses the mind and body and significantly diminishes the oxygen supply to the brain. Some of thoses soldiers were given tyrosine supplements prior to thisd challenge and some were not. Those who got the tyrosine performed much better on a variety of tests than those who did not getr the supplements. The tyrosine-dosed were more alert, efficient, less anxious and had fewer cpmplanits about the physical discomforts during the trial. There is also growing clinical evidence that suggest tyrosine may be an effective anti-depressant and even useful in some major forms of depression. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------(My comment here isI don't think this dose was high enough. It's less than I take when I need it... Dianne ) Tyrosine for depression:a double-blind trial byGelenberg AJ, Wojcik JD, Falk WE,Baldessarini RJ, Zeisel SH, Schoenfeld D, Mok GSDepartment of Psychiatry,University of Arizona, Tucson 85724. J Affect Disord 1990 Jun; 19(2):125-32 ABSTRACTWe treated 65 outpatients with RDC major depression in a randomized, prospective, double-blind comparison of oral L-tyrosine, 100 mg/kg/day, imipramine, 2.5 mg/kg/day, or placebo for 4 weeks. Tyrosine increased and imipramine decreased 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) excretion significantly, but there was no evidence that tyrosine had antidepressant activity. The only side effect to achieve statistical significance was greater dry mouth with imipramine. MHPG excretion and plasma amino acid concentrations failed to predict or correlate with clinical improvement. [This message has been edited by dianne (edited 08-14-2001).]
 

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Hi tom ...I've taken the amino acid L-tyrosine for many years as a preventative for psoriasis. Also, I know exactly when I need to top up with supplementation because I can feel my mind getting heavy and depressed, for no reason other than I need more tyrosine. Fixes it in a day or so... simple. I'm vegetarian for nearly 30 years now and I need extra tyrosine... but also meat-eaters can be affected by low tyrosine levels. I've often handed on this suggestion to others who have experienced excellent relief from depression and anxiety with tyrosinesupplementation.Pretty much it's extremely safe with a few precautions such as high blood pressure, hyperthyroidism and some other specifics. If you are taking specific anti-depression meds like SSRI's and MAO inhibitors you should not take it. But always check with your doctor or licensed practitioner first.( See the list below my signature)There are dozens of references out there for it -- here are just a few. ( There are others on the board who are better at finding research than I am.) I highly recommend it for anyone who suffers anxiety and depression and who talks with their doctor or professional first -- amazing to know these problems can be fixed nutritionally !!!!I know it has helped me for many, many years. Hope this doesn't get flamed ... but hey, I'll keep my fire extinguisher handy !Good luck Tom.Gentle thoughts to you all ...Dianne --------------------------------------------L-Tyrosine is an amino acid. Your body uses it to produce dopamine norepinephrine (noradrenaline) epinephrine (adrenaline) These are some of the main neurotransmitters in the brain. Attention deficit disorder can be caused by not enough dopamine or norepinephrine. Low levels of tyrosine, therefore, can result in ADD.What happens in this case is that the neo-cortex of the brain basically shuts down. This is the part of the brain that allows you to pay attention. Without enough dopamine and norepinephrine, all the effort in the world won't help much.That is why tyrosine is important. More tyrosine means more dopamine and norepinephrine. As a result, the neo-cortex can now function properly, and you can pay attention.L-Tyrosine can also be helpful for people with chronic fatigue narcolepsy anxiety depression low sex drive allergies headaches1 L-tyrosine aids in the functions of the adrenal, thyroid and pituitary glands. It is converted into thyroid hormone, or thyroxin,"which plays an important role in controlling metabolic rate, skin health, mental health, and growth rate. Tyrosine is specifically used to treat depression because it is a precursor for those neurotransmitters that are responsible for transmitting nerve impulses and essential for preventing depression."2Amino acids are the 20 building blocks of protein. Some amino acids are essential, and others are non-essential. Essential means that your body cannot produce them and so you must get them from your diet. Non-essential amino acids can be produced by your body from the essential amino acids.L-Tyrosine is a non-essential amino acid for most people, because your body can produce it from phenylalanine. (Some people have a genetic disease called phenylketonuria, or PKU, which prevents their bodies from converting phenylalanine into tyrosine.)Amino acids come in two forms, L- and D-, which are mirror images of each other. The L- form is found in food, and is generally the form used in our bodies.You can get some tyrosine in your diet, from such foods as fish poultry almonds avocados bananas dairy products lima beans pumpkin seeds sesame seeds3 Although tyrosine can be produced in our bodies, the question is whether you have enough tyrosine in your body to produce sufficient quantities of neurotransmitters.People who have ADD/ADHD, that is, inattentive or hyperactive ADD, may wish to take extra tyrosine, either from their diet or in the form of supplements, to increase their dopamine and norepinephrine.Who should avoid tyrosineBefore discussing how much tyrosine to take, you must be aware that tyrosine must be avoided if you are taking monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors tricyclic anti-depressants serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as Prozac Also avoid tyrosine if you are taking other pharmaceutical drugs used to treat mental or emotional conditions, such as depression.Avoid tyrosine if you have high blood pressure, muscular dystrophy or cancer, especially malignant melanoma.Avoid tyrosine if you are subject to heart palpitations.If you have a thyroid condition, such as hypo-thyroidism, don't take tyrosine without first consulting your doctor.If you have glaucoma, discuss the use of tyrosine with your doctor. Tyrosine is a stimulant (since it produces dopamine), and other stimulant drugs, such as Ritalin, are not to be taken if you have glaucoma.Dosages and Side EffectsTyrosine comes in tablets of 100 mg or 500 mg, or in powder form.According to Dr. Ray Sahelian, M.D., if you are taking supplemental tyrosine, you should start with 50 mg and slowly work your way up to higher levels. Observe very carefully what effects it is having, beneficial or otherwise. Discontinue if it causes irritation, anxiety or digestive problems.4Dr. Sahelian warns to be careful of your dosage of tyrosine if you are taking other stimulants. The effects of stimulants can be cumulative. He mentions DMAE, CDP-choline, pantothenic acid, methyl donors, ALC, CoQ10, DHEA, pregnenolone, St. John's wort, and ginseng.5Tyrosine supplements should be taken either on an empty stomach, with water, or with carbohydrate meals. This is so it doesn't have to compete for absorption with other amino acids, from protein food.According to Leon Chaitow, N.D., D.O.,"A high protein meal will increase blood and brain tyrosine to a degree but not enough to effect neurotransmitter synthesis greatly."6"Tyrosine has been found to be most effective when there exists a deficiency state. Patients who have previously responded to amphetamines may respond well to tyrosine therapy."7"small doses of tyrosine are more effective in increasing brain levels of neurotransmitters than large doses. Although blood and brain levels of tyrosine will increase with large doses, there appears to be an inhibition of the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase which converts tyrosine to neurotransmitters, when large amounts of tyrosine are present."8The Life Extension Foundation (LEF) suggests a daily dosage of L-Tyrosine of from 500 mg to 1500 mg, to fight depression.9 Presumably, in recommending such dosages, they are thinking of adults, not children.The editors of The Natural Pharmacy point out that clinical studies in which tyrosine was used for a variety of conditions involved dosages of up to 7 grams (7000 mg). They add that it is unclear if such large dosages are necessary.10LEF points out that clinical studies in which blood levels of subjects were raised to three times the level of controls were not accompanied by any evidence of side effects.11According to The Natural Pharmacy,"Tyrosine is not generally associated with side effects. Vitamin B6, folic acid and copper are necessary for conversion of tyrosine into neurotransmitters."12Contrast that with the side effect profiles of pharmacological stimulants, not to mention their cost, and L-Tyrosine looks like a safe, natural and cost-conscious alternative.Notes:1. Prescription for Nutritional Healing, third edition, by Phyllis Balch, CNC, and James F. Balch, M.D., Avery, 2000, pp. 51-2.2. Disease Prevention and Treatment, third edition, Melanie Segala, ed., published by the Life Extension Foundation, 2000, p. 536.3. Balch, p. 52.4. Mind Boosters, by Dr. Ray Sahelian, M.D., St. Martin's Griffin, 2000, pp. 142-3.5. Sahelian, p. 142.6. Thorson's Guide to Amino Acids, by Leon Chaitow, Thorson's, 1991, pp. 73-4.7. Chaitow, p. 74.8. Chaitow, p. 74.9. Segala, p. 235.10. The Natural Pharmacy, by Schuyler Lininger et al., Healthnotes Inc., 1999, p. 335. 11. Segala, p. 537.12. Lininger et al., p. 335. Tyrosine hydroxylase gene associated with depressive symptomatology in mood disorder bySerretti A, Macciardi F, Verga M, Cusin C, Pedrini S, Smeraldi EIstituto Scientifico H. San Raffaele, Department of Neuroscience,University of Milano School of Medicine, Milan, Italy.Connecticut Mental Health Center, Department of Psychiatry,Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven 06519, USA.robert.berman###yale.edu Am J Med Genet 1998 Mar 28; 81(2):127-30 ABSTRACTTyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine and norepinephrine. It may be involved in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders and positive associations have been reported for TH gene markers in mood disorders. While most replications failed to confirm the initial findings, other papers suggested a potential role of this gene in the etiology of mood disorders. Among the many different reasons for a lack of consistent replications, a critical role is played by the "correct" phenotype identification. Actually, up to now the only classification criteria has been the psychiatric diagnosis, but within the same psychiatric diagnoses the symptomatologic presentation may vary dramatically depending upon severity, presence of psychotic features or other psychopathologic traits. Thus, the aim of our study is to evaluate a possible association for TH gene with symptomatology in a sample of subjects affected by mood disorders. We have developed a phenotype definition based on the observed symptomatology divided into the four factors "Excitement," "Depression," "Delusion," and "Disorganization." Our sample includes 46 mood disorder subjects, investigated by the OPCRIT (operational criteria checklist for psychotic illness) checklist for their symptomatological pattern and typed for TH variants by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Depressive factor was associated with TH variants (F = 4.79, df = 4, 87, P = 0.006), with TH*2 subjects presenting lower depressive scores. Subjects with genotype TH*2/2 were the only ones in the sample to report mild depressive episodes. TH variants may be related with depressive symptomatology in subjects affected by mood disorders. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Tyrosine is not an essential amino acid, as it is sythesised in the body, from phenylalanine. Like phenylaalanine, tyrosine is intimately involved with the important brain neurotransmitters epinephine, norepinephrine, and dopamine. Animals subjected to stress in the laboratory have been found to have reduced levels of norepinephrine. ( Comment from Dianne : poor little sods.)Treating with tyrosine prior to stressing the animals prevents reduction of this neurotransmitter. Findings such as these led to human tyrosine experiments in which soldiers undergoing various forms of stress were given tyrosine to see what effect it might have on their performance. In one of these ecperiments, conditions were created that simulated a rapid ascent to 15,500 feet. This dramatically stresses the mind and body and significantly diminishes the oxygen supply to the brain. Some of thoses soldiers were given tyrosine supplements prior to thisd challenge and some were not. Those who got the tyrosine performed much better on a variety of tests than those who did not getr the supplements. The tyrosine-dosed were more alert, efficient, less anxious and had fewer cpmplanits about the physical discomforts during the trial. There is also growing clinical evidence that suggest tyrosine may be an effective anti-depressant and even useful in some major forms of depression. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------(My comment here isI don't think this dose was high enough. It's less than I take when I need it... Dianne ) Tyrosine for depression:a double-blind trial byGelenberg AJ, Wojcik JD, Falk WE,Baldessarini RJ, Zeisel SH, Schoenfeld D, Mok GSDepartment of Psychiatry,University of Arizona, Tucson 85724. J Affect Disord 1990 Jun; 19(2):125-32 ABSTRACTWe treated 65 outpatients with RDC major depression in a randomized, prospective, double-blind comparison of oral L-tyrosine, 100 mg/kg/day, imipramine, 2.5 mg/kg/day, or placebo for 4 weeks. Tyrosine increased and imipramine decreased 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) excretion significantly, but there was no evidence that tyrosine had antidepressant activity. The only side effect to achieve statistical significance was greater dry mouth with imipramine. MHPG excretion and plasma amino acid concentrations failed to predict or correlate with clinical improvement. [This message has been edited by dianne (edited 08-14-2001).]
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for posting all the information, Dianne. I think it also would be helpful to a lot of others here who get confused by thinking that depression and ibs and other things are all in the mind.tom
 
G

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for posting all the information, Dianne. I think it also would be helpful to a lot of others here who get confused by thinking that depression and ibs and other things are all in the mind.tom
 
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