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I too can really relate to your posts. And I think you are all amazing to share your stories.

I moved out of marketing into teaching when I had my family. The good thing about teaching is that you can do fewer hours than in an office, and if you can inspire your students, then you are really helping them along.

We moved region, and the last job I picked up was in a business school. Its ethics did not correspond to mine, the job was a farce, and my IBS became chronic. The job was axed after a year through budget cuts. This gave me the time to stop, to get off that blinding rollercoaster of doing, performing, thinking. I realized that the thinking was dominating my life for years - and fuelling my IBS. I had forgotten my body, and I was certainly not listening.

It took a full 18 months, basically because I was trying stuff out, but I have finally beaten my IBS. For now my career change is my blog, https://sickofibs.com. I am still giving a few private lessons, helping kids with their English, but I needed to share what I have learned about IBS and help others move forward too.

We are all wasting too much time and potential on IBS. Know that you can beat it. And do make it a priority.

Hope this helps someone,

Alison
 

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Thanks everyone for your stories, I am also currently in the predicament of not knowing whether it's the IBS or the job itself which is causing me to dislike it. I lack motivation, feel like the majority of my work is meaningless, but they are very understanding of my time off.
I'm struggling to find the courage for a career change, I don't feel comfortable relying on my partner financially, and I'm scared that I won't be able to hold down the new job after re-training due to IBS.
How did you decide which career to go for? Was it lead by your IBS or what you felt interested in? Or a bit of both?
 

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Thanks everyone for your stories, I am also currently in the predicament of not knowing whether it's the IBS or the job itself which is causing me to dislike it. I lack motivation, feel like the majority of my work is meaningless, but they are very understanding of my time off.
I'm struggling to find the courage for a career change, I don't feel comfortable relying on my partner financially, and I'm scared that I won't be able to hold down the new job after re-training due to IBS.
How did you decide which career to go for? Was it lead by your IBS or what you felt interested in? Or a bit of both?
A bit of both. I was a Product Manager for food. My taste buds went haywire and I was sick at trade fairs when I had to taste different products. I loved the job but had a difficult time with IBS and handling my boss' personality too. So I gave in my notice.

We moved to a different region and started a family, which made teaching a better option. Although I'm good at it, I don't really like teaching much. I love helping others to move forward, but I know my subject backwards. I now do a minimum and have launched out into my blog, SickofIBS.com. I am totally leaning on my partner financially but I am finally being myself and doing something I consider as really meaningful. I don't know where I am going financially, which is difficult to handle sometimes. But as I have finally beaten IBS, I want the knowledge about IBS to spread. I don't have all the answers yet but I am now more open to others and to opportunities.

You have 2 options: stay with your current job for now, even if you are bored, and work out what you are passionate about and work towards that goal OR find meaning to what you are currently doing.

I highly recommend a book called "The man who wanted to be happy" by Laurent Gounelle (available on amazon), a thought-provoking light fiction about finding your way.
 
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