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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

Let's get straight to the point: As a long time IBSer (been more than 14 years now that i can no longer eat a normal balanced diet due to IBS and autoimmune issues etc.)
I am looking for suggestions for vegetables and fruits that are actually KNOWN to be tolerated in most (i know everyone is different but still) IBSer that are sensitive.
To put things into perspective about what that means: the last time i tried 2 banana SLICES (very thin ones at that) i got met with bad reactions like gas, and slight cramps, and a bit of Diarrhea for like 4 days and bananas are supposed to work for MANY people with IBS).

What i currently CAN eat however (besides the obvious non irritating foods like white rice, all proteins and fats) sweet potatoes, corn salad / lamb's lettuce (so glad this one works at least but never tried other leafy greens), macadamia nuts (in small quantities, maybe 3 or 4 every 2 days) and papayas have worked well for years now, not sure why, as some people can't deal with them). So yeah, while these are nice and i am grateful, i really want to EXPAND my diet around more nutritional, dense foods but i am scared to flare my IBS again.
Also: anyone else's digestion WAY better in SUMMER where i can eat bigger amounts of even sometimes do watermelons without issues?

Thanks for ANY suggestions!
 

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It's really difficult, because what works for one person doesn't work for another. Even many of the low Fodmap foods annoy my gut, and yet I can eat some amounts of the high Fodmap foods!
The only way for each person is to test and try foods and decide which are not good, and which work.
It seems IBS diets are not one size fitting all.

For instance, I can eat honey with no problems at all (high Fodmap) I also have no issues with gluten, and many IBS-ers do. Toast and honey is one of my go-to foods when I am feeling really sensitive.

I can eat green (French) beans, lettuces of all kinds, moderate amounts of broccoli, moderate amounts of Pak Choy (aka Bok Choy), cucumber, kale, watercress in moderation, even sugar snap peas in moderation (which are supposed to be high Fodmap.) half a celery stick at a time, parsley, chives, spinach, peeled chickpeas in moderation, avocados in small amounts, boiled white potatoes, peeled and slightly salted. Occasionally radishes, yellow peppers, but those have to be steamed, not eaten raw.
All those give me no bad reactions.
The ones I can manage sometimes but mustn't eat regularly or every day are: carrots, turnips, tomatoes (skinned), puy lentils in small-ish amounts, bananas, the flesh-only part of oranges which means every segment has to be skinned! Blueberries (about 20-30 and no more)
But many people wouldn't be able to eat those foods, They are OK for me mostly, unless in a flare-up.

If I am having a flare, I really can't eat much veg and keep away from fruit completely. Yet during a flare I can tolerate a few cooked green beans and about 3 little gem lettuce leaves without them causing more upset. Usually eaten with a piece of plain steamed fish or hard boiled eggs, and white rice.

The one fruit I seem to be able to tolerate best is black grapes. But they have to be peeled! I can only eat them plus skins during one of my "normal" periods.

I only discovered my tolerances, and maximum tolerance amounts by trial and ...much error.

But like you, I also get periods when I am absolutely normal! Perfect bm's, no bloating, no trapped wind pains etc. At those times nothing I eat seems to upset my gut. Yet I still won't chance something like onions or garlic for example, and will still keep away from apples and pears (two of my favourite fruits.)

So the problem is, we are all so different and I think we have to tailor our own food lists based on our tolerances, and obviously reactions.

I have heard iceberg lettuce is easy on the gut. And one thing I found definitely is (with me) is wild-picked stinging nettle tops, washed well, and cooked in a small amount of water for about 10 minutes with a little salt. They are the most gentle vegetable on my gut and very nutritious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow, you can eat a LOT of things still! :eek:

So yeah, i am pretty sure most lists and recommendations that you can find on sites are then completely useless to pretty much any IBS-er, because it's just completely different for anyone.
What they recommend is just common sense even for normal people. I mean, yeah, no kidding, you're not supposed to eat a ton of garlic and beans or you're gonna upset your tummy. This goes for anyone, IBS or not. Sometimes i feel like the people that write those recs really have no clue what it is even LIKE to have serious IBS.

Rant over, anyway, i will give Iceberg lettuce a try i think... I never did so far, because it's not AS nutritious as other types so i always only wanted to try the things that would benefit me as well IF i were to to be able to eat them, but it's now time to go for more diversity i guess.

Interesting point about the "flares". It really is not described in the sparse "literature" there is about IBS in actual medical science that it works in flares, but it seems to be something that is happening to SO many of us, so there's got to be a missing link there somewhere.
 

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Well, I can't eat all those foods during a bad gut time. Those are okay only in the "not too bad" days, or the "normal" days.
If I am having a bad flare, as I say, I stay away from fruit, can only eat a couple of veggies, usually only a few green beans and some lettuce, and (in my case) may even be able to eat a tiny amount of broccoli -say two small florets. But many wouldn't be able to eat broccoli.
In a flare, the greatest percentage of my food intake is something like fish or hard boiled eggs. If I ate meat (which I don't like that much) then I guess chicken would be fine too. And I can handle boiled white peeled potatoes, noodles, white toast and white rice. Cake and plain cookies are also fine. Oddly, I am also OK with chocolate which is great.
No seasoning except salt, and no other things like mayo, dressings, spices, herbs, cream, cheese, fats except a little butter, nothing with any artificial sweeteners, but sugar is fine and causes me no problem.

So all in all, a basically unhealthy diet can almost always set me to rights in a few days. The more "binding" the food the better. Then I'll start to improve.
But then, I also have to watch out for the opposite effect, and be timely in introducing a couple more veggies or a few peeled grapes to off-set that! If I am really mindful and careful and listen to the changes in my body I can often swing the balance a bit one way or the other.

And yes, as far as I have learned, many with IBS do get normal periods. But I suppose that might not happen to everyone. I don't know if that is talked about anywhere else except the forums, where real people tell their stories. I just don't know. Some doctors may be aware of that though.
The only problem with those fairly symptom-free periods, is that I have absolutely no clue why they happen. Having kept a strict food diary, stress events diary, sleep diary, weather diary.....etc etc, I have never seen a logical pattern. I even foolishly believe IBS has gone away when they occur. My best time was 6 weeks last summer.

No, iceberg lettuce doesn't have a lot of nutrition, but you have to cut yourself some slack to get on the other side of a flare. I have to eat cake and cookies and white bread. I am grateful for a good A-Z multivitamin/mineral tablet per day and a vitamin B complex supplement too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I see... IBS on it's own is complicated enough to deal with... Now i am trying to find overlap between IBS friendly diet and AIP/modified Paleo diet as well, which is basically almost impossible. Yet, some conditions force us to do this and it almost becomes a full time job to try and manage your health issues in this way.

I decided i am going to try chives now. Decent nutrition value and supposedly rather low FODMAP. We shall see... Probiotics also often make a BIG difference with me, upping my tolerance quite a bit when i take them.
 

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Hi Michael, I hope you are managing recently?
I don't know what the AIP diet is. I'm not much into diets..... :( Low Fodmap is the closest I ever got to a "diet" and that's out of sheer necessity; noticing with my body how many high Fodmaps trigger my IBS, so I had to give it a try.
But Paleo....as far as I can see there are a lot of things with that which would be low Fodmap ? Meats, fish, eggs, would be, and quite a few veggies?
But, whether they all suit you is another thing. I know there are a few foods on the low Fodmap list that aren't great for my gut all of the time. And I have to be super careful with fruits, even low Fodmap ones!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi. Eh i manage somewhat, it's not great, but doing probiotics again right now and it's bearable, though as soon as i go a little overboard, things go back to D+ gas + cramps so i gotta dial back again.

AIP = autoimmune protocol diet, think of it like Paleo but even stricter (no eggs etc.) I'd LOVE to eat like that constantly, as it would likely help my many autoimmune issues, but the damn IBS won't LET me, unless i almost completely cut out all veggies+fruits and then i'm left with protein+fat basically. Not a great long term outlook.
 

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Yes, it's difficult for you to be on the autoimmune protocol diet AND the low Fodmap. It's more difficult as you are finding vegetables and fruits hard to deal with (and I have no idea how many of them are allowed anyway on the AIP.)

The Inuit apparently manage well without all the veggies and fruits we Westerners are used to. It seems their diet consists of mainly meat and fats. But they eat Seal meat and blubber which is rich in many nutrients (including vitamin C? I think so.)
But for us, a meat/fish/fat only diet wouldn't work so well.

If I were you I'd find any veggies that are OK on both diets, and gradually experiment with them to see which, and how much you can tolerate.

I forgot to mention mustard seed cress and mung bean sprouts. Those are usually pretty harmless, and if you find you can add them without bad effects, that would at least extend your veggie menu.
It's possible other sprouted seeds might work for you too. Broccoli sprouts (nothing like broccoli for the gut to handle as far as I know), sunflower seed sprouts, etc.
Sprouts are rich in nutrients and easy to digest. Be careful with them. They need to be from a reputable source, or they can cause upset. Home made sprouts carefully taken care of when they are sprouting, and using a proper sprouter and seeds fit for purpose are safe enough so long as they are kept clean and eaten fresh. They are also way cheaper!

But it's always a case of experimenting, and then the old adage "start low and go slow."
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, it's difficult for you to be on the autoimmune protocol diet AND the low Fodmap. It's more difficult as you are finding vegetables and fruits hard to deal with (and I have no idea how many of them are allowed anyway on the AIP.)

The Inuit apparently manage well without all the veggies and fruits we Westerners are used to. It seems their diet consists of mainly meat and fats. But they eat Seal meat and blubber which is rich in many nutrients (including vitamin C? I think so.)
But for us, a meat/fish/fat only diet wouldn't work so well.

If I were you I'd find any veggies that are OK on both diets, and gradually experiment with them to see which, and how much you can tolerate.

I forgot to mention mustard seed cress and mung bean sprouts. Those are usually pretty harmless, and if you find you can add them without bad effects, that would at least extend your veggie menu.
It's possible other sprouted seeds might work for you too. Broccoli sprouts (nothing like broccoli for the gut to handle as far as I know), sunflower seed sprouts, etc.
Sprouts are rich in nutrients and easy to digest. Be careful with them. They need to be from a reputable source, or they can cause upset. Home made sprouts carefully taken care of when they are sprouting, and using a proper sprouter and seeds fit for purpose are safe enough so long as they are kept clean and eaten fresh. They are also way cheaper!

But it's always a case of experimenting, and then the old adage "start low and go slow."
Yeah it's difficult... actually TONS of vegetables are allowed on AIP, which....makes it a hard fit with low fodmap lol :(

What you described is what i am doing actually, or have been for years now... i just need to be more courageous with trying out NEW veggies. It's just that i get used to NOT feeling pain and cramps in my abdomen constantly, so since i already have enough other health issues to deal with as is, i don't want to add on TOP of that to be even more miserable. But i now realize this is a catch-22 that i can't get out of UNLESS i first go through this pain to add more veggies to my diet, or else the microbiome is NEVER gonna get better on it's own and things will spiral further out of control... So difficult, normal people can't even imagine what a vicious circle this all is...

Yeah, i used to do sprouts 20 years ago i think for a while... homegrown too, but what a hassle on top of it all nowadays... i will try to find reliable quality ones i can just BUY, and give them a try.
 

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Not sure that it’s going to fit you in particular, but I would suggest you take some steroids. I had something like this too and needed to go to the toilet every other couple of hours. It wasn’t really fun, and one man told me that SARMs from purerawz.co could help me to fight this disease. They are usually intended to gain muscle mass and treat some muscle diseases, but they also helped me with this weird diarrhea. I am not sure whether it was IBS, but it was something close to it. So, if you are doing sports and want to be both healthy and ripped, then you can pay some attention to this stuff.
 

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Hello everyone,

Let's get straight to the point: As a long time IBSer (been more than 14 years now that i can no longer eat a normal balanced diet due to IBS and autoimmune issues etc.)
I am looking for suggestions for vegetables and fruits that are actually KNOWN to be tolerated in most (i know everyone is different but still) IBSer that are sensitive.
To put things into perspective about what that means: the last time i tried 2 banana SLICES (very thin ones at that) i got met with bad reactions like gas, and slight cramps, and a bit of Diarrhea for like 4 days and bananas are supposed to work for MANY people with IBS).

What i currently CAN eat however (besides the obvious non irritating foods like white rice, all proteins and fats) sweet potatoes, corn salad / lamb's lettuce (so glad this one works at least but never tried other leafy greens), macadamia nuts (in small quantities, maybe 3 or 4 every 2 days) and papayas have worked well for years now, not sure why, as some people can't deal with them). So yeah, while these are nice and i am grateful, i really want to EXPAND my diet around more nutritional, dense foods but i am scared to flare my IBS again.
Also: anyone else's digestion WAY better in SUMMER where i can eat bigger amounts of even sometimes do watermelons without issues?

Thanks for ANY suggestions!
Applesauce. Canned pears in heavy syrup.
 
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