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People have been posting things about GERD, but I am absolutely clueless. I have no idea what it is. Please help explain. Thanks.
 

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It's the acronym for GastroEsophageal Reflux Disease. A lot of people with heartburn have GERD. I get heartburn but my doc said it's not GERD because I don't have a lot of acid in my esophagus or stomach. GERD left untreated could lead to erosion of the lining in the esophagus from all the acid. Not very fun! I think most docs prescribe Proton Pump Inhibitors like Prilosec for it.
 

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It's the acronym for GastroEsophageal Reflux Disease. A lot of people with heartburn have GERD. I get heartburn but my doc said it's not GERD because I don't have a lot of acid in my esophagus or stomach. GERD left untreated could lead to erosion of the lining in the esophagus from all the acid. Not very fun! I think most docs prescribe Proton Pump Inhibitors like Prilosec for it.
 

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A little bit more about GERD. You have a smooth muscle closure at the top of your stomach called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The regulation of this muscle(s) is heavily influenced by neurons that have both excitatory and inhibitory properties, effectively alternating between excitation that maintains closure, and inhibition that results in LES relaxation (allowing food through). Research suggests that it may be inappropriate transient relaxations of the LES that allow the (entry) reflux of the acid into the esophagus. Christian
 
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A little bit more about GERD. You have a smooth muscle closure at the top of your stomach called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The regulation of this muscle(s) is heavily influenced by neurons that have both excitatory and inhibitory properties, effectively alternating between excitation that maintains closure, and inhibition that results in LES relaxation (allowing food through). Research suggests that it may be inappropriate transient relaxations of the LES that allow the (entry) reflux of the acid into the esophagus. Christian
 
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