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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have had some problems for the past year with a change in bowel habits and anemia, so my doctor is sending me for a colonoscopy. The surgeon doing it, sends me a piece of mail, whereby he asks for my insurance info, ssn, etc. A prescription for stuff to drink, no food messages and discontinue iron meds. NOTHING at all about the procedure. What it is. What he does. If I will be conscience, unconscience, etc. Is this the usual way doctors handle these procedures. I am angry - but will wait until after to write and let them know just how insensitive and impersonal the whole experience has been.Any others feel this way? grant
 

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My GI was the same way,he had the nurse explain all the details of the colonoscopy.When I had mine the worst part was the prep,I couldn't tolerate that stuff,but I've had alot of friends who had no problem.I was given an IV at the hospital,and something to relax me,but it didn't put me to sleep because I got to watch the test on the tv along with the doctor,and that was pretty cool.It didn't hurt or anything just felt a little uncomfortable at first.I don't know why they do that,don't they realize people have a fear of the unknown.It'll be fine.Good Luck.
 

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Hi grant:Here's some info from the Jackson Gastroenterology site on colonoscopies:Colonoscopy Colonoscopy is the visual examination of the large intestine (colon) using a lighted, flexible fiberoptic or video endoscope. The colon begins in the right-lower abdomen and looks like a big question mark as it moves up and around the abdomen, ending in the rectum. It is 5 to 6 feet long. The colon has a number of functions including withdrawing water from the liquid stool that enters it so that a formed stool is produced. Equipment The flexible colonoscope is a remarkable piece of equipment that can be directed and moved around the many bends in the colon. These colonoscopes now come in two types. The original purely fiberoptic instrument has a flexible bundle of glass fibers that collects the lighted image at one end and transfers the image to the eye piece. The newer video endoscopes use a tiny, optically sensitive computer chip at the end. Electronic signals are then transmitted up the scope to a computer which displays the image on a large video screen. An open channel in these scopes allows other instruments to be passed through in order to perform biopsies, remove polyps or inject solutions. Reasons For The Exam There are many types of problems that can occur in the colon. The medical history, physical exam, laboratory tests and x-rays can provide information useful in making a diagnosis. Directly viewing the inside of the colon by colonoscopy is usually the best exam. Colonoscopy is used for: Colon cancer -- a serious but highly curable malignancy Polyps -- fleshy tumors which usually are the forerunners of colon cancer Colitis (ulcerative or Crohn's) -- chronic, recurrent inflammation of the colon Diverticulosis and diverticulitis -- pockets along the intestinal wall that develop over time and can become infected Bleeding lesions -- bleeding may occur from different points in the colon Abdominal symptoms, such as pain or discomfort, particularly if associated with weight loss or anemia Abnormal barium x-ray exam Chronic diarrhea, constipation, or a change in bowel habits Anemia Preparation To obtain the full benefits of the exam, the colon must be clean and free of stool. The patient receives instructions on how to do this. It involves drinking a solution which flushes the colon clean or taking laxatives and enemas. Usually the patient drinks only clear liquids and eats no food for the day before the exam. The physician advises the patient regarding the use of regular medications during that time. The Procedure Colonoscopy is usually performed on an outpatient basis. The patient is mildly sedated, the endoscope is inserted through the anus and moved gently around the bends of the colon. If a polyp is encountered, a thin wire snare is used to lasso it. Electrocautery (electrical heat) is applied to painlessly remove it. Other tests can be performed during colonoscopy, including biopsy to obtain a small tissue specimen for microscopic analysis. The procedure takes 15 to 30 minutes and is seldom remembered by the sedated patient. A recovery area is available to monitor vital signs until the patient is fully awake. It is normal to experience mild cramping or abdominal pressure following the exam. This usually subsides in an hour or so. Results After the exam, the physician explains the findings to the patient and family. If the effects of the sedatives are prolonged, the physician may suggest an appointment at a later date. If a biopsy has been performed or a polyp removed, the results of these are not available for three to seven days. Benefits A colonoscopy is performed to identify and/or correct a problem in the colon. The test enables a diagnosis to be made and specific treatment can be given. If a polyp is found during the exam, it can be removed at that time, eliminating the need for a major operation later. If a bleeding site is identified, treatment can be administered to stop the bleeding. Other treatments can be given through the endoscope when necessary. Alternative Testing Alternative tests to colonoscopy include a barium enema or other types of x-ray exams that outline the colon and allow a diagnosis to be made. Study of the stools and blood can provide indirect information about a colon condition. These exams, however, do not allow direct viewing of the colon, removal of polyps, or the completion of biopsies. Side Effects and Risks Bloating and distension typically occur for about an hour after the exam until the air is expelled. Serious risks with colonoscopy, however, are very uncommon. One such risk is excessive bleeding, especially with the removal of a large polyp. In rare instances, a tear in the lining of the colon can occur. These complications may require hospitalization and, rarely, surgery. Quite uncommonly a diagnostic error or oversight may occur. Due to the mild sedation, the patient should not drive or operate machinery following the exam. For this reason, someone should be available to drive the patient home. Summary Colonoscopy is an outpatient exam that is performed with the patient lightly sedated. The procedure provides significant information used to determine which specific treatment will be given. In certain cases, therapy can be administered directly through the endoscope. Serious complications rarely occur from colonoscopy. The physician can answer any questions the patient has. Related Diseases Colon Polyps/Cancer | Constipation | Crohn's Disease | Diarrhea | Diverticulosis/Diverticulitis | Gas | Irritable Bowel Syndrome | Ostomy | Prevention of Colon Polyps/Cancer | Rectal Bleeding | Ulcerative Colitis Related Diets Clear Liquid
 

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FYI, about a dozen years ago I was given a flexiscope by a surgeon in our clinic, which was ordered by my internist at the time. They gave me nothing for sedation for the procedure. I became so painful that I told them I could not stand the procedure to go on any longer. They continued anyway. My colon was spasming and they open it back up with air that is delivered through the scope to open the colon up so they can go further up to see the lining. Sense that time, I have never let anyone run a scope on me again. I won't even go to a regular gastro doc cause I know that is what they will want to do to check me out to see how I'm doing. I had a proctoscope once that was certainly uncomfortable but nothing like the flexiscope. I've had this happen to me with doctors with a urologist not sedating me in anyway to give me a cystoscope one time for checking out the shadow (kidney stones) in my bladder. How come some doctor's are so unfeeling for their patient's when there is clearly sedation available for the task at hand??Brendy
 

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Grant,I am not sure that I would let a Dr. perform a colonoscopy on me who I felt I couldn't talk to. That is just me. Now maybe he is a very good Dr.; alot of the good ones do have a poor bedside manner as well. I would however be sure to get what you need out of him/her or their office, i.e. questions asked prior to the procedure. Don't get me wrong here when I say this but from my experience women are willing to push to get their questions answered -- sometimes men don't push as hard to get the answers they want. I base this observation from working in the medical field for years and also from how my husband handles these situations.You owe it to yourself not to be treated unfairly.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wow, what allot of info - you might want to drop some of it off at your local doctors' offices and they can SHARE! Really, thanks. And I did not mean to fool anyone, but I am a woman not a man. I just had to use my last name because my first and middle were taken. Just that fact that I am going to write the "secret society" is a dead give away that I am not a male! I also know I put conscience instead of concious. Boy, did I feel dumb about that one. I really appreciate all the info and feel better with more knowledge about the whole procedure. Thanks a million to you all. I go Monday! Can't wait for Tuesday! Grant
 

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Hi GRANT...I just now stopped in to the community for a few minutes and saw this for the first time.Uh, am I misunderstanding you or are you scheduled to be scoped already this Monday, but have never met the doctor who going to do the procedure? And this method of contacting you and educting you in the prep...What the hell is the practice of medicine coming too! I am sorry but I have been in healthcare for over 30 years and stuff like this just makes the hair on my neck stand up.Personally, and I am just sharing my feelings with you since you posted this, I would not have the procedure until the doctor has a preliminary patient conference with me personally and answered himself or herself all the questions you just asked. I mean, while the procedure is relatively benign, it IS invasive and I think every patient should have some face time with the invader in advance.I am sorry...on't get me worng...if you are now comfortable with the whole thing, sure, go ahead...you must be in an HMO not a PPO.Best regardsMNL__________________ www.leapallergy.com
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Dear Grant,I had a colonoscopy done several years ago by a doctor I had never met. He turned out to me one of the nicest doctors. He explained the procedures and the nurse reassured me that I would be sedated and wouldn't feel a thing. It was fine much easier than a sigmoidoscopy. Good Luck!jwbird
 

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Grant I had an experience like this when I had my lower gi done. It was so awful. They did not tell me what was going to happen to me. I was in SO MUCH PAIN. They didn't talk to me the whole time. THe nurse and the doctor sat there the whole time and talked about whatever they felt like talking about. IT's like I wasn't even there! I was so sick from the pain and I just kept asking "HOw much longer?" They told me they didn't know. When it was all over, I was bleeding A LOT. I will never ever ever ever ever go back to that hospital again to have anything done. They were the most cold hearted people I have seen in a hospital in awhile. Lucky for you...you will most likely be asleep during your procedure. They will give you something probably that will make you forget it ever happened. I would call the doc that sent you for the test. Ask what you should do about your meds. Chances are the surgeon thinks your doc already gave you the info you need. To this surgeon you are nothing but another butt to scope (Please excuse that.) It's like they don't even see you as a person! Sorry you are going through this. Believe me there are a lot of docs who don't even care about you as a person.., they just want to do the job and get paid. It infuriates me.s n t
 
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